Dog Health

Monthly Low Cost Vaccines Starting in May in Hendersonville

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 5.15.10 PMIn an effort to make vaccinations accessible and affordable to the animal and residents of Henderson County, Blue Ridge Humane Society now offers low cost vaccines the third Monday of every month from 1:00 PM – 5:30 PM at our Adoption Center beginning May 2018. The Adoption Center is located at 88 Centipede Lane in Hendersonville, NC.

Before administering vaccinations, pets receive an examination from a licensed veterinarian, and owners are educated about the importance of preventive care when it comes to their pets health.

To receive vaccinations at a Blue Ridge Humane Society clinic, pet owners must meet ONE of the below required criteria:

  • Receive Public Assistance (SNAP, DSS, SSI, SSDI, unemployment, disability, Medicaid)
  • Fall below HUD Income Guidelines
  • Full-time college student
  • Military Service Member or Veteran

The day of the vaccinations, pet owners must bring with them the following items:

  • Please bring proof of prior vaccinations including a Rabies Certificate (a rabies tag will not count).
  • All animals should be in good health and have not shown previous signs of aggression.
  • All cats should be in carriers and all dogs should be leashed upon arrival.
  • Owner must bring proof of how they meet the required criteria for vaccination at a Blue Ridge Humane Society.
 Vaccine Prices
  • Rabies 1 year (Dogs or cats over 3 months) – $10.00
  • Rabies 3 year (Dogs or cats with rabies certificate, a tag will not count as proof of previous vaccination) – $10.00
  • Bordetella  (Dogs over 2 months) – $10.00
  • DA2PPV (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks) – $10.00
  • FVRCP (Cats over 2 months) – $10.00
  • Microchip (Dogs or cats over 2 months) -$15.00

For more information, visit: https://www.blueridgehumane.org/community-services/low-cost-vaccines/


Be Aware of Household Poisons

ID-100395000According to the ASPCA, "Toxic chemicals, dangerous plants, as well as products and substances found in our everyday surroundings can be poisonous or even fatal to animals. Unfortunately, a pet can ingest a household chemical, lap up a liquid, or chew on a seemingly harmless plant -- and become sick and even die."

The ASPCA's Poison Control Center has put together a helpful brochure that lists in detail common household hazards, has poison prevention tips, and discusses how to put together a poison safety kit for your dog or cat. The Poison Control Center also provides a hotline staffed by veterinarians who can advise you in case of emergency. You can reach them 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, at 888-426-4435.

Download a free copy of the ASPCA Poison Control Center brochure at the link below (PDF).

Download Aspca household hazards

Image: Alex Ugalek, freedigitalphotos.net


Low Cost Vaccinations - Asheville, March 24

AHS Low Cost VaccinationsAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Saturday, March 24 from 2 to 5 PM at Groce United Methodist Church, 954 Tunnel Road, Asheville, NC 28805. No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.


ReTail Scene: NC Company Offers Dog Nutrition and Health App

Screen Shot 2018-02-20 at 3.51.06 PMPetrics, a Wilmington, NC pet technology company, is now offering a health and nutrition application for pets that "gives you the tools necessary to ensure proper diet and safety for your pet." The application features:

  • A database of over 15,000 pet foods and treats that can be scientifically matched and personalized to your dog's individual needs
  • A comprehensive ingredients analyzer
  • At home delivery and auto-ordering of pet foods
  • Pet food recommendations based on genetic risks and pre-existing medical conditions
  • Schedule reminders for vet visits and medications
  • Recall alerts

The app can be downloaded free. More information is available at: https://www.petrics.com/

This company has also just introduced the world's first connected pet bed, which maintains a comfortable temperature for your dog and also reports on body temperature, heart rate, and other data.


The Benefits of Grain-Free Dog Food

Guest Post by Olivia Williams

ID-10049938Dog-lovers everywhere simply want the best for their pooches. And when it comes to providing our four-legged, furry friends optimum nutrition, many of us would rather choose grain-free dog food for a variety of reasons, many of which are tied to the benefits of grain-free dog food. Here are some of them:

  • More nutrients per gram of dog food

 Ancestral dogs always preferred meats over any other type of food. However, today’s dogs aren’t necessarily carnivores; in fact, they are omnivores like you and me.

Sadly, with the commercialization of dog food, companies sometimes minimize production costs. Instead of putting high-quality ingredients in sufficient amounts into dog food, some companies use ‘fillers’ in the form of wheat, corn, and other cereal grains for the simple fact that these are generally ‘cheaper’ than protein like beef or chicken. That is why low-quality dog foods will have a greater proportion of these so-called ‘fillers’ that do not necessarily contain all the right amounts of nutrients needed by your pooch.

But when you give your dog grain-free food, you are almost certain that the ‘fillers’ have been significantly replaced with more nutritious ingredients such as wholesome grains, vegetables, and fruits as well as more protein like chicken, beef, turkey, and others. This simply means you are giving your dog more nutrients for exactly the same amount of dog food.

  • Less incidence of food allergies

 Wheat, corn, and soy, as well as other cereal grains, are considered allergenic. Chicken, pork, and beef as well as any other food that has protein in it can also be allergenic. The good news is that the digestive system of a dog is naturally designed to digest proteins from animal sources a lot more efficiently than they do proteins coming from cereal grains. This leads to fewer incidences of food allergies and other forms of allergies in dogs. The reason is simple. Because an allergic reaction is triggered by the exposure of a protein molecule to immune system cells, digesting large proteins into peptides and amino acids eliminates this antigen-recognition capability of immune system cells.

 Since dogs are able to digest animal proteins into amino acids, they experience less stomach upsets and other symptoms of food allergies. On the other hand, since they cannot process cereal grain proteins into amino acids that efficiently, some of the undigested proteins are ‘sensed’ by the immune system of the dog, triggering an allergic response.

  • More energy to support your dog’s lifestyle

 It is important to distinguish the difference between a grain-free and carb-free dog diet. Dogs, like us, rely on carbohydrates for energy. This is especially true if you’re the type of dog-owner who goes on a trek with your pooch on the trails of the Blue Ridge Mountains or even the Great Smoky Mountains. They will need energy for the adventure. While cereal grains are a good source of carbohydrates, these are not the only sources. For instance, sweet potatoes and rice, often found in grain-free food, are excellent sources of carbohydrates for your pooch. They’re generally friendly to the tummy, too. This can help support your dog’s active lifestyle.

  • Healthier skin and coat

 Trekking in the Blue Ridge Mountains means exposing your dogs to the elements, not to mention objects and particles that can irritate its skin and make its coat frizzled. Since a grain-free dog diet has more nutrients that come from healthier grains, fruits, and vegetables, you can feel more confident about promoting healthier coat and skin for your pet. This is the function of antioxidants that are mostly found in many fruits and vegetables. As such, dog foods that are rich with these kinds of nutrients can help improve the condition of your pet’s skin and coat.

  • Less shedding

 Because your dog’s coat is naturally healthier brought about by the various nutrients that are supplied to every hair root, your pooch will have lesser incidence of shedding. Your dog will still shed its fur, but this will be significantly less than if your pet were on a dog food that contains cereal grains. This can also translate to easier cleaning of your upholstery and carpet at home.

There are many other reasons why pet parents today would want grain-free dog food for their beloved pets. You only want to give your dog the best nutrition possible, just like any responsible parent would give to her kids.

Olivia Williams is mum of 2 and a true animal lover with 3 dogs, 2 cats and a parrot called Charlie. Heading up the content for MyPetNeedsThat.com amongst a busy family schedule, her goal is to try help people all around the world become better pet owners.

Image: Aopsan, Freedigitalphotos.net


Low Cost Vaccinations - Candler, Feb. 24

AHS Low Cost VaccinationsAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Saturday, February 24 from 11 AM to 2 PM at Francis Asbury United Methodist Church, 725 Asbury Road, Candler, NC. No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.


Do You Sleep with Your Dog?

Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 4.35.23 PMAbout half of U.S. pet owners sleep with their pets, and about 45 percent of dog owners sleep with their dogs.

Do you sleep with your dog? If so, you are definitely not alone! But there are some things that you should know about sleeping with your dog. There are health benefits and health risks, for example, and there are tips to make the experience more enjoyable for both of you.

The folks at Tuck.com, whose aim is to to improve sleep hygiene, health, and wellness through the creation and dissemination of comprehensive, unbiased, free resources, have put together "Sleeping with Pets." This informative guide answers a lot of questions about sleeping with your dog, including one all dog owners wonder about: "Is snoring normal for dogs?"

You'll find this free guide here:  https://www.tuck.com/sleeping-with-pets/

Image: Tuck.com


How to Perform CPR on Your Dog

ID-100238757It's a scary scenario: Your dog chokes, stops breathing, or is unconscious. You know you need to get your dog to the vet or emergency animal hospital, but you can take some simple steps first that may save your dog's life.

In an article that originally appeared on DogHeirs.com and was republished with permission by Reshareworthy.com, you'll find detailed instructions for performing CPR on your dog. Three specific actions are recommended:

  1. Perform 100-120 chest compressions per minute
  2. Perform a compression to mouth-to-snout ventilation ratio of 30 compressions followed by 2 breaths
  3. Perform cardiac massage / chest compressions according to the different chest types and sizes of dogs.

The article includes illustrations as well as a video that will be very helpful in applying these techniques properly. Performing CPR on your dog is not unlike performing it on humans -- and it could make the difference between life and death.

Find the article here: http://www.reshareworthy.com/cpr-for-dogs-and-cats/

Image: Photokanok, Freedigitalphotos.net


Oil Diffusers can be Dangerous to Dogs

Screen Shot 2018-01-19 at 3.49.32 PMThis is an alert from the ASPCA...

"If you have been on social media lately, you may have seen articles or posts concerning essential oils, oil diffusers and the potential danger they may pose to your pets. Essential oils have been, for a long time, a popular home remedy for a number of maladies including nasal congestion, anxiety, sore muscles and skin conditions, among others. With the sudden popularity of oil diffusers—an easy way to release these oils into your home—there has been an emergence of alarm about how these oils may affect animals in the home.

"In their concentrated form (100%), essential oils can absolutely be a danger for pets. Dogs and cats who have either walked through oils, gotten some on their coat or had oils placed directly on them can develop health concerns.

Symptoms include:

  • Unsteadiness on the feet
  • Depression
  • Low body temperature (in severe cases)

 If a pet ingested concentrated essential oils, you may see vomiting, diarrhea and depression, as well."

For more information about the possible dangers of oil diffusers, go to:

https://www.aspca.org/news/latest-home-trend-harmful-your-pets-what-you-need-know


Vaccine Clinic - Greenville, SC, Feb. 3

Screen Shot 2018-01-19 at 4.16.20 PMGreenville Humane Society holds a monthly vaccine clinic the first Saturday of the month. In February, the clinic will be held on Saturday, February 3 from 9 AM to 12 PM. All dogs must be leashed and all cats must be in carriers.

No appointment is necessary. Get all of your animal's shots starting at just $9, with no additional fees. All fees go directly back to care for the animals they serve. They also offer heartworm testing, rabies vaccines, ear cleaning, microchipping and much more. Be sure to get your pet's flea/tick/heartworm preventative while you're at the clinic!

Greenville Humane Society's facility is located at 305 Airport Road in Greenville, SC. For more information, including a detailed list of vaccination prices, go to: https://www.greenvillehumane.com/vaccine-clinic/


Low Cost Vaccination Clinic - Asheville, Jan. 28

AHS Low Cost VaccinationsAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Sunday, January 28 from 11 AM to 2 PM at Asheville Humane Society, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville, NC (off Brevard and Pond Roads near the WNC Farmers Market). No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.


ASPCA's Holiday Survival Guide

ID-10034507The holiday season may be a wonderful time for getting together and celebrating family and friends but, sadly, it can also be a time when we overlook holiday hazards for our pets.

The ASPCA has published a brief "holiday survival guide" that outlines some of the primary hazards, including unsafe medications, holiday goodies that are "baddies" for pets, and holiday plants that can cause illness. Also included are the "Big 5 Holiday Dangers" according to the ASPCA Poison Control Center.

Keep all of your pets safe this holiday season. Download this handy one page survival guide below at the link below (PDF).

Download HolidaySurvivalGuide

Image: Photostock, Freedigitalphotos.net


New Canine Nutrition Resource

Screen Shot 2017-11-16 at 1.01.36 PM
The Pet Food Institute (PFI), whose members make 98 percent of all U.S. pet food and treat products, recently launched a new series of interactive infographics showing the ways the key nutrients found in a complete and balanced dog food recipe help our pets. The new web resource, 'Nutrition from Nose to Tail,' provides fast facts about the essential nutrition that fuels our dogs' growth and supports their body systems, as well as non-essential nutrients that can also serve important functions. 

 "PFI's new 'Nutrition from Nose to Tail' resource was designed to assist pet lovers in understanding how a carefully formulated recipe will help their dog," said Cathleen Enright, PhD, president and CEO of PFI. 'Nutrition from Nose to Tail' shows the ways that the essential nutrients support pet health, for example by providing energy or promoting vision or healthy joints, and also reviews other important non-essential but functional nutrients such as carbohydrates. 

Check out this free resource here: https://www.petfoodinstitute.org/pet-food-matters/nutrition-2/nutrition-nose-tail/


Everything You Need to Know About Pet Insurance

More pet parents today than ever before are showing interest in pet insurance due to the rising cost of pet care. The first pet to be insured in the USA was a female Rough Collie dog and TV star Lassie, back in 1982. As the number of pet owners increase, there has been a huge upsurge in the number of companies offering pet insurance, particularly in North America.
 
Screen Shot 2017-11-08 at 3.19.15 PM
An APPA (American Pet Products Association) study estimates that in 2017, veterinary care in the US cost $16.62 billion to pet owners, and they paid $14.93 billion for over-the-counter medicine for their cats and dogs. Today,an estimated 1.8 million pets are insured in the United States with annual premiums averaging between $163 per pet to $496 per pet, depending on the insurance plan.
 
Pet insurance can be very helpful in saving money on routine check-ups, medicine and vitamins, and surgical bills. But the problem many pet owners face is the abundance of choices, with different rules and regulations, and every company’s plan being slightly different. So do you pick a pet insurance plan that’s right for you and your four-legged companion? 
 
It all comes down to asking the right questions and comparing the most important aspects of each pet insurance policy. TopDogTips.com magazine has put together an infographic with a large list of pet insurance tips and sample questions you can ask your future insurance provider that will help you narrow down the best choices.
 
You'll find this helpful resource here: https://topdogtips.com/pet-health-insurance-tips/ 

Walk-in Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic - Greenville, SC

Screen Shot 2017-11-02 at 4.44.26 PMGreenville Humane Society operates a walk-in vaccine clinic at their new medical facility, 305 Airport Road in Greenville, SC. The clinic is open from 9 AM to 12 PM Monday through Friday and from 9 AM to 12 PM the first Saturday of each month. No appointment is needed. Call (864) 263-5611 for information. The clinic offers the following low-cost services:

Vaccine Price
1-Year Rabies Vaccine $9
3-Year Rabies Vaccine $25
1-Year Canine/Puppy Distemper/Parvo-DHPP $9
3-Year Canine Distemper/Parvo-DHPP $25
Canine Kennel Cough-Bordatella $15
Heartworm Antigen Test (dogs) $25
Feline Distemper Vaccine $9
Feline Leukemia (FeLV) Vaccine $15
Feline Leukemia/FIV Combo Test $26

5 Parasites and Diseases to Watch Out For

Guest Post by Allivet

Let's say you're going canine cruising (aka "on a dog-friendly road trip"). Whether you're heading to Lake James State Park or Mt. Mitchell, your best friend will have a blast--and perhaps come home with a muddy, wet coat.

Before you take your dog on the adventure of a lifetime, learn about some of the microscopic dangers that await in the Carolina mountains. (They could be more dangerous than bears!)

Here are five scary diseases and parasites to look out for--and what you can do to stop them from infecting your four-legged pal.

1. Leptospirosis

A common waterborne disease, leptospirosis is caused by the bacteria leptospira. It's found within lakes, streams and wet soil in the Carolinas. It's spread through animal urine.

The dangers of leptospirosis can be severe. As Katie Gibson, DVM, writes, "leptospirosis can enter your pet's body through the eyes, nose, mouth or cuts on the skin," and it can be life-threatening if left untreated. Most often, dogs recover well with antibiotics and supportive care.

Symptoms are vague, but can include diarrhea, fever, vomiting, decreased appetite and general weakness. As an owner, be aware of the risk of leptospirosis, and act immediately if you suspect your dog has been infected. Dogs can infect humans with this.

2. Blue-Green Algae

Although the name sounds cool, blue-green algae (aka cyanobacteria) can be very dangerous to come into contact with. It's dangerous when a blue-green algae harmful algal bloom occurs, which are over-growths that can produce harmful toxins in lakes and other bodies of water. This typically happens during times of bright sunlight (summer) and when the water isn't moving much.

According to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, the "algae can cause skin irritation or respiratory irritation" and "some blooms of blue-green algae can produce chemicals that are toxic to animals and people who drink the untreated water." So, symptoms range from rashes and skin irritation to respiratory failure and death.

Look for blue-green algae before letting your dog go play in the water. It can look reddish-brown or even bright-green (or just blue-green, as the name suggests).

3. Giardiasis

The Mayo Clinic states that giardia infection is "one of the most common causes of waterborne disease in the United States," as the "parasites are found in backcountry streams and lakes."

If you head into the wilderness with your dog, giardia is something to be aware of. Your dog can ingest it by drinking from a puddle or stream. All it takes is a contaminated water source.

Symptoms include diarrhea and dehydration. The good news is that giardia isn't as serious as some of the other parasites and diseases on this list. Typically, antibiotics and a dewormer are enough to cure it.

4. Cryptosporidiosis

The parasite and disease are both commonly called "crypto" among experts. In simple terms, cryptosporidiosis is a disease caused by parasites of the genus cryptosporidium. The primary symptom is diarrhea, which will be easy to notice.

The issue is that infection can be hard to stop. As the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services notes, "crypto may be found in soil, food, water or surfaces that have been contaminated with the feces from infected humans or animals."

Beyond diarrhea, symptoms your dog may also experience when infected include fever, vomiting and dehydration. Generally speaking, with proper treatment, your dog won't be sick for more than a week or two with cryptosporidiosis.

5. Campylobacteriosis

Caused by campylobacter, campylobacteriosis is the reason for common food poisoning. 

When out in nature, dogs will drink water contaminated with the bacteria. Although it usually affects puppies that are six months or younger, you should still look out for it if your dog is older. Symptoms include diarrhea, high fever and loss of appetite.

What's reassuring to know is that, for the vast majority of cases, your dog can get better with antibiotics or naturally expel the bacteria. To find out if your dog is infected with campylobacter, a stool test is done.

How to Prevent and Kill These Parasites and Diseases

In a perfect world, there would be a method for preventing your dog from getting sick from these parasites and diseases. Unfortunately, there's not. But you can take preventive measures and prepare yourself. This way, you not only greatly reduce the chance of your dog getting infected, you also reduce the likelihood of a negative outcome if infected.

In short, here's what you can do:

  • Get the right vaccines: For instance, a DHLPP distemper vaccine includes protection against leptospirosis (note the 'L' in the name of the vaccine). There is also a vaccine for giardia.
  • Look into at-home treatments: Heartgard Plus prevents canine heartworms in dogs by eliminating the tissue stage of heartworm larvae for a month.
  • Know the water: In general, it's not common for a dog to get ill after swimming in a stream or lake in North Carolina, but it does happen. A good rule is, if you wouldn't swim in it, don't let your dog swim in it.
  • Recognize symptoms: If your dog is ill after being out in the wilderness, get to a vet immediately.
  • Know where the closest vets are: Before you go on a trip, look up where the closest veterinarians are.

Allivet is the trusted pet pharmacy since 1992.


Low Cost Vaccinations - Leicester, Oct. 28

AHS Low Cost VaccinationsAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Saturday, October 28 from 11 AM to 2 PM at Leicester Community Center, 2979 New Leicester Highway, Leicester, NC. No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.


Dog Food and Feeding Myths

Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 3.54.26 PM
There is a lot of misinformation floating around when it comes to dog food and feeding your dog. As you may know, dog food is big business, so some misleading information may be coming from dog food manufacturers who are trying to convince dog owners that their product is better than a competitor's. Other misinformation is spread via undependable online resources.

TopDogTips.com has put together a nifty infographic called "32 Dog Food and Feeding Myths" that debunks some of the commonly held myths. It covers such topics as human food, prescription food, hypoallergenic food, grains, raw food, and more. It should be a helpful resource for all dog owners.

Find the infographic here: https://topdogtips.com/dog-food-myths/