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Cmdog-masthead 12.41.13 PMWelcome to Carolina Mountain Dog! This is a "blogazine" for dog lovers who live in or near the Carolina mountains (or wish they did). Please read the About page for more details. Be sure to check the  sections above for additional information. Subscribe to the right to get our regular alerts. Bookmark this blog with our shortcut URL: www.cmdog.com 
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Sundays in August: Hiking Hounds

Screen Shot 2021-01-03 at 2.45.08 PMHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

Hiking Hounds takes place every Sunday in August starting at 9 AM.

Spots for two new hikers will be available on each hike.

If you are a new hiker… once you sign up for a hike you will be sent a link to a virtual orientation. You must watch this, and sign a waiver before attending a hike. All new hikers will come on their first hike without a dog; you will be paired with a hiking buddy to become familiar with the process of the program, and make sure this is an activity you will enjoy. 

If you are a seasoned volunteer… you are asked to watch the orientation as a refresher and you will be sent the link when you sign up for a hike.  

Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com. Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first serve basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. If you don’t get an email from Hiking Hounds, assume they didn’t get yours!

Please be sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

Start time is 9 AM. Hikes are typically 3-5 miles at a brisk pace with elevation changes and provide vigorous exercise for our volunteer hikers as well. They do not cancel hikes because of rain, as our pups don’t mind getting wet. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM.

Hiking Hounds operates with the following updated protocol: PLEASE READ 

 AHS has relaxed their masking requirements for vaccinated individuals. Hiking Hounds has made some changes to our protocol as well:

  • We will continue to ask all volunteers to stay in the parking lot, and not come into the front of the building. The hike leaders will sign in the volunteers and will bring the dogs out to them; it is safer for the dogs to keep them outside.  
  • We will maintain a 6 foot bubble as usual, for the safety of our volunteers and the dog's safety and comfort; this includes the parking lot and the trail. 
  •  We will continue to eliminate bandanas and cards about the dogs; we can promote them thru social media.
  • We will continue to have one hiker go ahead of our caravan with all the Arboretum passes. That hiker will alert the security personal at the gate & will swipe ALL the passes so each hiker does not have to handle them. 
  • When we return to the shelter, all volunteers will again stay outdoors and the hike leaders will come get your dog. This is our normal procedure as our dogs always need social distancing.  
  • All equipment that we use will be sanitized between hikes.

 For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Ah-Choo! Does Your Dog Reverse Sneeze?

Simone-dalmeri-FUR242Eu_z4-unsplashMy little dog occasionally snorts uncontrollably. While the episode doesn't last long, it's actually pretty frightening to watch since it looks like he is in considerable discomfort. According to our vet, it's a harmless condition that's quite common in dogs. The official name is "mechanosensitive aspiration reflex" but it is colloquially known as "reverse sneezing."

If your dog ever does this, PetPlace.com has published a very comprehensive article about reverse sneezing that should allay any fears. The article includes:

  1. What is Reverse Sneezing in Dogs?
  2. What Does a Reverse Sneeze Look Like?
  3. How Long Do Episodes of Reverse Sneezing Last?
  4. What Does Reverse Dog Sneezing Sound and Look Like?
  5. What Causes Reverse Sneezing in Dogs?
  6. Which Breeds are Most Likely to Reverse Sneeze?
  7. What is the Treatment for Reverse Sneezing in Dogs?
  8. How to Stop a Reverse Sneezing Episode in Dogs
  9. What to Watch For
  10. Prevention of Reverse Sneezing in DOgs
  11. FAQs About Reverse Sneezing in Dogs
  12. Final Thoughts on Reverse Sneezing in Dogs

Read the article here:

https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-health/reverse-sneezing-in-dogs/?

Photo by Simone Dalmeri on Unsplash


Caution! Beware of Xylitol

CautionMany dog owners know that if ingested, chocolate is dangerous to dogs. But more than half of dog owners don't know about the danger of another common substance: Xylitol.

Xylitol is found in sugar-free gum, but increasingly, it is also found in other foods as a substitute for sugar. It may be in candy, mints, peanut and other nut butters, cookies, ice cream, yogurt, jams, syrups and even toothpaste.

According to PreventiveVet.com, xylitol poisoning cases reported to the ASPCA's Animal Control Poison Center have skyrocketed. For example, in 2005, just 201 cases of xylitol poisoning were reported. Just five years later, in 2010, 2,537 cases were reported. In 2018, 6,760 cases were reported. Those are just the cases reported to the ASPCA -- not every case of xylitol poisoning.

In July 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) published a report on the dangers of xylitol to dogs. The FDA wrote:

In both people and dogs, the level of blood sugar is controlled by the release of insulin from the pancreas. In people, xylitol does not stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas. However, it’s different in canines: When dogs eat something containing xylitol, the xylitol is more quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, and may result in a potent release of insulin from the pancreas.

This rapid release of insulin may result in a rapid and profound decrease in the level of blood sugar (hypoglycemia), an effect that can occur within 10 to 60 minutes of eating the xylitol. Untreated, this hypoglycemia can quickly be life-threatening...

Dr. Martine Hartogensis, a veterinarian at the FDA recommends, "Check the label for xylitol in the ingredients of products, especially ones that advertise as sugar-free or low sugar. If a product does contain xylitol, make sure your pet can't get to it."


Disaster Plan for Your Dog

Hurricane-harvey-3624911_1920No one likes to think about facing a disaster, but it's entirely possible that you may someday have to face a hurricane, flood, tornado or other natural disaster. That's why it makes sense to have a disaster plan not just for yourself, but for your dog.

The ASPCA has put together a helpful disaster planning document for dog owners that includes these sections:

  • Ready Your Dog
  • Prepare Your Home
  • Locate a Temporary Caregiver (if your dog cannot stay with you after you evacuate)
  • Create an Emergency Kit (includes a Pet First Aid Kit)

You can download this free document (PDF) at the link below.

Download Aspca-disaster-plan-dogs

Image by andrewtheshrew from Pixabay


Mondays and Wednesdays - Mountain Mutts Hikes

Screen Shot 2021-04-21 at 2.30.17 PMNothing could be finer than a hike in Carolina in the morning... especially with dogs! If you're looking to enjoy the beautiful outdoors with some deserving dogs and animal lovers, consider becoming a volunteer hiker for Asheville Humane Society's "Mountain Mutts." The more hikers, the more dogs that get some quality time outside of the animal shelter.

Mountain Mutts convenes in the parking lot at Asheville Humane Society (Forever Friend Lane, off Pond and Brevard Roads near the WNC Farmers Market) every Monday and Wednesday morning beginning at 8:30 AM. The Monday hike is about 4 to 5 miles, while the Wednesday hike is slightly easier at 3 to 4 miles on flatter trails.

New hikers are encouraged to join Mountain Mutts, but you must first register as a volunteer and go through some basic training. If you have an interest, please contact the Asheville Humane volunteer coordinator, Kelly Paul by email: volunteer@ashevillehumane.org or by phone: (828) 761-2001 ext. 307.

Image: Asheville Humane Society Mountain Mutts