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July 2012

Workouts for Dogs on Rainy Days

By Joanne Francisco for Exceptional Canine

5 Rainy-day Workouts for Dogs

When hurricanes and tropical storms hammer the East Coast in late summer, dog owners face the same predicament we all face on rainy days, no matter the season. How can you work out during inclement weather?

Some breeds are quite averse to getting wet; even your pond-swimming Labrador may not like being rained on. However, a little creativity will get your dog moving indoors, even in a limited space. Here are five rainy-day workouts to keep your dog active:

  • Hide treats or toys around the house; your dog will love locating them.
  • Play hide-and-seek with your dog. This is a great game for bonding. We encourage it even when the sun is shining.
  • Play “Cookie Come,” a game in which two people position themselves on either side of the house and call the dog back and forth, rewarding him with a treat or favorite toy. This reinforces basic commands and gives your dog great exercise.
  • Set up a retrieving game, but make sure you don’t play on a slippery surface like tile or wood.
  • Walk your dog up and down your stairs. Or teach him to walk on a treadmill. (It’s possible and effective!)


Use Treats Wisely
When you use treats for any game, they should be healthy dog treats -- not people food. And make sure to use them in very small amounts. We like to use the smallest dog biscuits available and then break them up into even smaller bits. You don’t want your dog to get sick or to gain weight. If your dog is motivated by balls or favorite toys, those are even better than treats.

Getting Out in the Wet and Cold
If your dog is still a puppy, you can help him adjust to the rain. Get him out in all types of weather. Just because you don’t like to go out doesn’t mean your dog can’t get accustomed to wet weather and even enjoy it. Some tips to get outside with your pal:

  • Install an awning or a shelter beside your house so your dog can get used to being outside when it’s raining.
  • Invest in some rainwear for yourself but not your dog. Doggie raincoats are cute but not very practical.
  • Award your dog with treats to get him to take his initial steps outside.
  • If possible, find sheltered areas in which to walk.
  • Make sure your dog’s head stays under your umbrella. Most dogs don’t like rain in their eyes because they have no way of shielding them.

Joanne Francisco and her husband, Craig, own VIP Dog Training Inc. in Ronkonkoma, N.Y. They have been training dogs since 1979, and they specialize in problem-solving and basic obedience. Francisco’s blogs have previously appeared in Exceptional Canine.


Free Pet Meditations, Hendersonville, July 30, August 5

AliceMcCallOn Monday, July 30th from 7 to 8 PM, Alice McCall will lead a free guided healing pet meditation via teleconference. Any pet owner is invited to attend, but advance registration is required.

On Sunday, August 5th from 3 to 4 PM, McCall will lead the same free meditation in-person for those in Hendersonville, North Carolina. Socialized, leashed pets are welcomed to attend with their owners. Advance registration is required.

To register for either event, email: alice@healingpath.info .

“Both events are about giving us a new way to connect with our furry friends, and spend time together in a unique way. Pets can reap the benefits of meditation, just as people do,” says McCall.

McCall’s meditations feature a technique called toning. Using her voice, she holds and sometimes manipulates a note. She believes that each sound corresponds with specific energies or chakras. “I’ve been told time and again how my toning during a meditation makes all the difference for someone’s experience," says MacCall. "I commonly hear from individual’s who have never been able to quiet their active mind and thoughts that my toning allows them to stay centered and in the moment of the meditation.”

McCall holds a B.S. in Psychology and a MBA. She is a Cellular Level Healing Consultant, Spiritual Counselor, Hypnotist, and Author. For additional information about the meditation sessions and other services, visit the website: http://healingpath.info/


Purina Ultimate Air Dogs at Bele Chere!

ScreenHunter_01 Jul. 26 13.13It's the end of July... so it must be time for Bele Chere, Asheville's premier street festival. One of the most popular events year after year is the Purina Ultimate Air Dogs, this year presented by Ingles. These agile animals love flying through the air to catch a favorite toy and splashing in a pool, specially rigged for the occasion.

Here's when the Air Dogs will be performing at Bele Chere:

Fri., July 27 - 6 PM and 8 PM
Sat., July 28 - 12 PM, 2 PM, 4 PM, and 6 PM
Sun., July 29 - 12 PM and 2 PM
The finals are Sunday at 4 PM.

Stop by and cheer them on!

And a friendly reminder: NO DOGS are allowed inside the festival limits. If you forget, or if you're looking for a place nearby where your dog can chill out, come on over to "Doggy Jail," located in front of City Hall. Animal Compassion Network volunteers will keep an eye on your pooch in a cool, clean and friendly place for $5 per hour, or a maximum of $20.

Photo: http://www.ultimateairdogs.com/


Free Fearful Dog Session - Asheville, July 28

Be Brave

Pet Behavior Aid will hold a free information session for owners of fearful dogs on Saturday, July 28, from 10 AM to 12 PM.

Topics include how to help your dog gain confidence, learning how to understand signs of anxiety and when to step in, how to prevent fear from becoming aggression, and fundamental techniques to help your "wallflower" blossom. The session will be held at the Asheville Humane Society Adoption and Education Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville. Humans only, please.

For more information, visit www.petbehavioraid.org or call (828) 707-0644. This session is sponsored by Pet Behavior Aid, an organization dedicated to to increasing the retention of companion animals in their homes in Western North Carolina.

Photo credit: Image: Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Low Cost Shot Clinic - Asheville, Weaverville, July 28

Dog_being_vaccinatedNeed to get your dog or cat vaccinated? Come to a low-cost shot clinic on Saturday, July 28. In Asheville, the clinic will be held at Tractor Supply on Old Brevard Road from 9 AM to 12 PM. In Weaverville, the clinic will be held at Tractor Supply on Monticello Road from 1 to 3 PM.

1 and 3-year rabies shots are just $10. (You must have a prior certificate to get a 3-year vaccine.) DHLPP or DHPP is $15 and Bordetella (kennel cough) is $15. A FVRCP/FELV combination vaccination for cats is $20.

This service is sponsored by Buncombe County and is provided by James Boatwright, DVM. For more information call (828) 553-5792.


Yappy Hour, Greenville, SC, July 27

GreenvilleyappyhourThe Greenville Humane Society (SC) is hosting a Yappy Hour on Friday, July 27 from 5:30 to 7:30 PM. A $5 cover charge includes beer, bark, band (DJ) and a chance to tour the society's new state-of-the-art facility. At no additional charge, dogs can play freely in the canine courtyard.

All canines should be on leash, be dog-friendly, spayed or neutered, and up to date on vaccinations. For more information, call (864) 263-5610, or visit: www.greenvillehumane.com .


Low Cost Vaccinations, Asheville, July 21

Dog_being_vaccinatedNeed to get your dog vaccinated? Come to a low-cost shot clinic on Saturday, July 21 from 11 AM to 3 PM at Pet Harmony, the Pet Store for Rescued Pets, 803 Fairview Street off Hendersonville Road) in Asheville.

1 and 3-year rabies shots are just $10. (You must have a prior certificate to get a 3-year vaccine.) DHLPP or DHPP is $15 and Bordetella (kennel cough) is $15. Microchip with free registration is $15, and a single application of Advantix/Advantage is $15 for a dog. Low and no cost spay/neuter vouchers are also available.

This service is sponsored by Animal Compassion Network and provided by Dr. Margaret Moncure, DVM. For more information call (828) 274-3647.


Foster Homes Needed! Learn More at Fosterpalooza, Asheville, July 21

AHS fosterOne of the important ways more animals' lives are saved in Buncombe County is through foster homes.

Asheville Humane Society's foster program is like having satellite shelters. With animals placed in foster homes, there is room to take in more animals at the Buncombe County Animals Shelter.

Asheville Humane Society uses a network of foster families who open their homes and hearts to puppies, kittens, dogs, and cats in need. For the most part, these animals just need a place to stay for a short while until they can be put up for adoption. They may be shy, overwhelmed by shelter life, injured, or ill. Asheville Humane Society provides everything a foster family needs and covers all costs. You should provide the love.

Come to Fosterpalooza on Saturday, July 21 from 1 to 3 PM to learn more about what it takes to be a foster home for an animal in need. It's a great experience for anyone, in particular with children who can become even more involved during the summer when school's out.  You'll meet foster parents and foster animals and the kids will have fun things to do at this family-friendly event.

Fosterpalooza will be held at the Asheville Humane Society Adoption Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (behind Harmony Motors and across from Asheville Ford, off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market). For more information visit www.ashevillehumane.org, or check out this video:

 

Photo: Asheville Humane Society


Visit Avery County's New Adoption Center

ACHSBuildingOn April 15, 2012, after 24 years of operation out of a little metal building on Stamey Brand Road, Avery County Humane Society closed its doors in preparation for a move to a spacious and modern Adoption and Humane Education Center at 279 Vale Road in Newland, NC.

The Adoption and Humane Education Center has 21,128 square feet of space for people and animals. Almost half of the space is dedicated directly to animal care. It includes play areas for the animals and adoption rooms where families can meet and get to know a pet before they commit to bringing it home.

The new facility is now open Mondays through Saturdays from 10 AM to 4 PM, and Sundays from 12 PM to 3 PM for adoptions only. The Avery County Humane Society invites everyone in the community to visit the new facility. Volunteers interested in socializing kittens, helping with animal care, learning dog training skills, providing foster care, or assisting in other ways should visit www.averyhumane.org for information. The new phone number for the Avery County Humane Society is (828) 733-2333.


Low Cost Vaccinations, Asheville, July 21

Dog_being_vaccinatedNeed to get your dog vaccinated? Come to a low-cost shot clinic on Saturday, July 21 from 11 AM to 3 PM at Pet Harmony, the Pet Store for Rescued Pets, 803 Fairview Street (off Hendersonville Road) in Asheville.

1 and 3-year rabies shots are just $10. (You must have a prior certificate to get a 3-year vaccine.) DHLPP or DHPP is $15 and Bordetella (kennel cough) is $15. Microchip with free registration is $15, and a single application of Advantix/Advantage is $15 for a dog. Low and no cost spay/neuter vouchers are also available.

This service is sponsored by Animal Compassion Network and provided by Dr. Margaret Moncure, DVM. For more information call (828) 274-3647.


Free Housetraining Session-Asheville, July 12

ScreenHunter_02 May. 23 15.15Pet Behavior Aid is offering "Housetraining 101," a free one hour housetraining help session, on Thursday, July 12 from 7 to 8 PM. The session will be conducted in the Asheville Humane Society education room at 14 Forever Friend Lane in Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads near the WNC Farmers Market).

Topics include:

  • How to teach your dog when and where to eliminate
  • Housetraining schedules
  • Management options including crate training
  • Proper accident cleanup
  • Troubleshooting

The help session is free and open to the public, but donations are accepted and appreciated. Humans only, please.

For more information, visit: www.petbehavioraid.org, email info@petbehavioraid.org, or call (828) 707-0644.


Summertime Puppy Social - Asheville, July 14

ID-10036262Your puppy needs socialization with other dogs to develop into a healthy, balanced pet. Join other puppy owners at a puppy social on Saturday, July 14 from 9 to 10 AM, at Asheville Humane Society's Adooption and Education Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Pond and Brevard Roads near the WNC Farmers Market).

Mingle with other puppy parents and get your training questions answered by certified trainers while your puppy romps with other pups and meets new and different people and things. Doggie treat bag and human treats provided for all participants.

Requirements:
- Ages 9-20 weeks of age
- Puppies must be healthy
- Must be in home at least 10 days prior to coming to social
- Must have at least 2 sets of vaccinations
(copy of vet records required)
- Rabies vaccine is required (16 weeks and older)

This is a FREE family friendly event, but space is limited! Reserve your puppy’s spot today. Call (828) 707-0644 or email  info@petbehavioraid.org to make a reservation. For more information visit www.petbehavioraid.org

Image: nixxphotography / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Star Spangled Whiskers - $17.76 Adoptions! July 6, 7

FireworksIf you think the fireworks on July 4 were something to remember, how about this for an Independence Day celebration: Every animal is just $17.76 per adoption at Asheville Humane Society on Friday and Saturday, July 6 and 7, from 12 to 6 PM Friday and 10 AM to 6 PM Saturday!

This special "Star Spangled Whiskers" adoption event is only happening for two days, some come on in and grant independence to a wonderful dog or cat looking for a home. Adoptions include vaccinations, microchipping, spay/neuter, a month of free pet insurance, a free well-check, and a starter bag of food.

Check out the website for photos of adoptable animals or better yet, stop by the Adoption Center at 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (behind Harmony Motors and across from Asheville Ford, off Brevard and Pond Roads near the WNC Farmers Market).

This is a celebration you won't want to miss!

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Create a Dog Friendly Backyard

By the Editors of Exceptional Canine for Exceptional Canine

Create a Dog-friendly Backyard

The weather is warm, and the backyard beckons. Your dog is probably just as eager as you are to enjoy time outside.

But although your pal may be ready for a romp through the yard and a roll in the grass, it’s up to you to make sure your yard is just as ready. It’s time to think like the parent of a very active toddler and create a dog-friendly backyard.

A Backyard Safety Checklist
Before you let your dog loose in your fenced-in yard, it’s important to consider any potential hazards. Check for these common threats:

  • Fences Most of us rely on some type of metal or wooden wall to keep our dogs from roaming, but make sure the material you’ve chosen to construct your fence includes no sharp edges or splinters. Also, put your dog in a breakaway collar so that, if she gets tangled up, she can free herself with a tug or two. This is also extra insurance for those of you with jumpers who aim to hurdle over fences. (Some agile dogs can leap to the top, but are unable to clear the tall posts when their collars get stuck.) You’ll finally want to survey the fence for loose boards and other types of damage that might have occurred during the winter months.
  • Chemicals Many commercial fertilizers and weed killers are now safe for animals, provided the manufacturer’s instructions are followed -- but others can cause illness. Beware of rodent and insect repellants. Read the label on each package before using a chemical product in your yard, and consider organic methods when possible. Keep your veterinarian’s number readily available in case of poisoning or call the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.

  • Plants Some of gardeners’ most beloved flowers and bushes, including tulip and daffodil bulbs, are harmful when ingested by dogs. Research before planting.
  • Pools/hot tubs Dogs love to take a plunge, but sometimes the high walls of these swimming holes are too high for them to climb out safely. Always make sure to cover or fence in your water spots.
  • Lack of shade Your dog will need plenty of shade and water to keep from overheating on warm days.
  • People food and beverages Take time to think about your dog when you host backyard cookouts and parties. It can be more difficult to police drinks and food when guests leave cups and plates underneath lawn chairs and the like. Make sure your dog doesn’t have access to alcoholic beverages and harmful foods such as chocolate, raisins and grapes, advises the ASPCA.

Consider These Alternatives
If you are concerned about your dog spending unsupervised time in your yard, consider using a dog run where he can safely romp. A toddler’s plastic play area might work for smaller dogs and has the advantage of portability.

If you feel that your dog is safe in your yard and you are worried about your flowers, consider chicken wire. Fencing your flowers with chicken wire offers a nearly invisible force field that will deter the most determined doe or Dachshund.

Ticked off the checklist? Then it’s time to relax and enjoy some yard time with your best friend.

Photo: @iStockphoto.com/jeffdalt