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February 2016

January 2016

Volunteer to Help Buncombe County's Homeless Animals!

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Would you like to help homeless animals in Buncombe County? Then come to the Volunteer Job Fair at Asheville Humane Society on Saturday, Jan. 30 from 10 AM to 12 PM.
 
Volunteering is a great way to "pay it forward" while you gain the satisfaction of helping animals in your community. Asheville Humane Society has numerous opportunities to apply your skills to a rewarding experience. There is something for everyone!
 
The following departments will have booths set up with information on the opportunities they have available:
 
Adoption Center - Behavior - Community Pets - Development - Special Events/Dine To Be Kind - Foster - Hiking Hounds and Urban Tails - Medical - Offsite Adoption Events - Safety Net - Shelter - Transport - Volunteer
 
Jobs range from Customer Service Greeter and Urban Tails Coordinator to Community Events Assistant and Lost and Found Ambassador! Flyers with job descriptions will be provided.
 
Come see how you can use your skills to serve the animals!

The Volunteer Job Fair will be held at the Asheville Humane Society Adoption & Education Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville. The Center is conveniently located off I-40 near the WNC Farmers Market, right off Brevard and Pond Roads, on the Animal Care Campus behind Harmony Motors.

Low Cost Vaccinations and Microchips - Jan. 31

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 10.58.02 AMThe Buncombe County Department of Health, Buncombe County Sheriff's Animal Services Division, and Asheville Humane Society are collaborating to provide animal owners with access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Sunday, January 31 from 11 AM to 2 PM at Asheville Humane Society, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market). No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year - (Dogs or cats over 4 months)  - $11.00
Rabies 3 year - (Dogs or cats over 4 months with rabies certificate to prove current on rabies) - $11.00  
Bordetella - Kennel cough - (Dogs over 2 months)  - $15.00
DAPP - Distemper, Adenoxirus Type 2, Parainfluenza and Parvo - (Dogs over 2 months)  - $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia - (Cats over 2 months) - $20.00
Microchip - (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  - $10.00 

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.

 


Best-selling Author Speaks in Asheville, Feb. 17

Screen Shot 2016-01-22 at 11.54.58 AMCarl Safina, PBS host and best-selling author of the book, Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel, will speak in Asheville on Wednesday, February 17 at 6 PM. The event, starting at 5:30 PM for snacks and followed by Safina's talk, will be held at the Lenoir-Rhyne University/Asheville Chamber of Commerce building at 36 Montford Avenue.

Safina's book will be available that evening, as well as at Malaprop's Bookstore, and the author will do a book signing following his talk. This is a ticketed event ($20) and tickets should be purchased in advance. You can purchase tickets here.

If you cannot attend, learn more about Beyond Words and consider purchasing the book directly from Amazon below.


Volunteer Job Fair to Help Buncombe County Animals - Jan. 30

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Would you like to help homeless animals in Buncombe County? Asheville Humane Society is holding a Volunteer Job Fair on Saturday, Jan. 30 from 10 AM to 12 PM.
 
Volunteering is a great way to "pay it forward" while you gain the satisfaction of helping animals in your community. Asheville Humane Society has numerous opportunities to apply your skills to a rewarding experience. Volunteer opportunities include working directly with key staff members in the following roles: Community Events Assistant, Group Service Project Coordinator, Digital Fundraising Associate, and Canines-in-the-Community Ambassador. 
 
Interested? Come and learn about these and many more new and exciting opportunities available for volunteers with Asheville Humane Society.

The Volunteer Job Fair will be held at the Asheville Humane Society Adoption & Education Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville. The Center is conveniently located off I-40 near the WNC Farmers Market, right off Brevard and Pond Roads, on the Animal Care Campus behind Harmony Motors.

Indoor Winter Play

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 11.52.20 AMEven during winter weather, dogs need stimulation and exercise. If you can't get outside, pet behaviorist Arden Moore has some great suggestions for things you can do with your dog. Arden writes about the following games in Tails Pet Magazine:

"I hide, you seek. Here’s a fun game to reinforce your dog’s basic obedience cues. Have your dog sit politely by your side on one end of the living room or at one end of the hallway. Throw a treat across the room. As your dog darts after it, slip around the corner out of sight and call your dog by his name. When he races to you, reward him with a treat and plenty of praise. Repeat a few times. You can step it up by having him sit and stay in one room while you hide in a bedroom or even in a bedroom closet. You are making it fun for your dog to come when he is called, and letting him release some energy, too.

Treat your dog to a little Houdini magic. Hold a small treat in one closed fist and keep your other fist empty. Extend both arms and ask your dog, “Which hand has the treat?” Let her sniff both. When she noses the fist with the treat, open it, show her, and praise her. Repeat, randomly moving the treat into your left or right hand.

Create an obstacle course. Temporarily clear a large space in your living room or basement and set up a small agility course. Line up a series of paper plates on the floor for your dog to weave in and out of—first with his leash on and then on his own, once he gets the hang of it. Position an ottoman or beanbag in the middle of the floor, and instruct your dog to leap over it or leap upon it and hold a sit. Treat and praise for a job well done."

Read Arden Moore's entire article here.


Pet Weight Translator Shows Dog-Human Comparison

Scale-300x224Obesity is a nagging problem -- not just in humans, but in dogs, too.

Vets concerned about the growing pet obesity epidemic want people to know that a 12 pound Yorkie is the same as an average female weighing 218 pounds and a 14 pound cat is equivalent to a 237 pound man. The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) has created an online pet weight translator and tables of the most common breeds that compare those extra pounds on our pets in terms we can all relate to.

APOP Founder and President Dr. Ernie Ward remarks on why the group created these tools. “As a veterinarian I’m always looking for ways to demonstrate how serious even a few extra pounds on a pet can be. These tables and calculations put pet weights in human terms, making it easier to understand."

Ward hopes to educate pet lovers about the dangers of pet obesity and poor nutrition. “Over half the nation’s dogs and cats are now overweight, making obesity the leading health threat of our pets. Largely preventable diseases such as arthritis and diabetes are being seen in record numbers costing pets their life and owners millions in medical bills. The reality is most of these cases could be avoided simply by preventing weight gain and shedding excess pounds.” One of the key barriers to pet weight loss is an owner’s denial of the problem which Ward calls the ‘fat gap.’ 

So what can pet owners do to fight excess weight in their pets? According to Ward, “The single most valuable tool a pet owner has in the fight against obesity is a measuring cup. Most pet owners don’t measure how much they’re feeding and even fewer know how much they should be feeding.”

Start by understanding your dog's weight in human terms using the Pet Weight Translator. You'll find it here: http://www.petobesityprevention.org/pet-weight-translator/

Image: www.petobesityprevention.org

 


Hiking Hounds - Jan. 24

Hiking houndsIs one of your New Year's resolutions to get more exercise? Then you'll love "Hiking Hounds"!

Hiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Two Sunday mornings each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, January 24. Start time is 10 AM for repeat hikers and 9:30 AM for new hikers. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Donations for Animals Accepted at Hard 2 Recycle, Jan. 16

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 4.25.10 PMAsheville Humane Society will be collecting animal sanctuary items on Saturday, Jan. 16 from 10 AM to 2 PM at the West Asheville Hard 2 Recycle collection event. Collection will take place at the Aaron's Rent-to-Own Parking Lot, 1298 Patton Avenue in West Ashevile. Collection will also take place at the Enka AB Tech Campus, 1461 Sand Hill Road, Candler, from 10 AM to 1 PM.

Plastic totes, shoe boxes, crates (wire/plastic), towels, blankets, pet toys, non-pellet stuffed animals, leashes (non-retractable), dry pet food (unopened), clay kitty litter, and cleaning supplies including laundry detergent will be accepted and be used by Asheville Humane Society to assist in the care of local animals at the Buncombe County Animal Shelter and the Society's Adoption Center. Donated pet food will be distributed to families in need with pets.

For more information, visit http://www.ashevillegreenworks.org/hard-2-recycle.html


$6 Adoption Fees - Jan. 15, 16

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Need a fresh start this year? How about a new friend? Adopting a pet might be the perfect change you need to kick off 2016! A furry companion will keep you warm during the winter months and happy all year long!

This Friday and Saturday, January 15 and 16 from 10 AM to 6 PM, all dogs over 25 pounds and cats 6 months or older are just $6 at Asheville Humane Society's Adoption Center. Their dogs and cats are waiting for their new beginning, too... so now is the time to bring love into your life...and theirs!

Although the love of a pet is priceless, $6.00 adoption fees represent an exceptional value. All adoptions include spay/neuter, all up-to-date vaccines, medical and behavioral screening, initial flea preventive, microchipping and free 1-year registration, a free starter bag of food, one month of complimentary pet health insurance, and a free post-adoption veterinary office visit with a participating veterinarian.

Stop by the Adoption Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market), and see all the animals available for adoption at www.ashevillehumane.org.


Project Yellow: A Dog Safety Project

Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 4.01.48 PMEver see a dog with a yellow ribbon? That's a signal that the dog needs space on walks -- and it helps keeps pets and their people safe.

In support of "Project Yellow," Asheville Humane Society provides free yellow ribbons for dogs who need space on walks. Come visit the store at the Adoption and Education Center at 14 Forever Lane (off of Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market) to get a free yellow ribbon for your pup if you need one.

We should always ask permission to pet someone’s dog or to approach a pet we don’t know. For dogs who need space this is especially important. To signal to others to use caution and give your dog space, you can tie a yellow ribbon on your dog’s leash. Dogs who need yellow ribbons may range from deaf dogs who need to be approached a special way to dogs who are leash-reactive and need space around other dogs. 

If you have questions about Project Yellow, call Asheville Humane Society at (828) 761-2001.


Pet First Aid & CPR Class - Asheville, Jan. 23

Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 10.51.31 AMJoin other pet parents and pet professionals from the Asheville area for a pet first aid & CPR training class on Saturday, January 23 from 9:30 AM to 3 PM presented by Pet Tech Pet CPR & First Aid Training. This is the most comprehensive Pet First Aid & CPR training class available. 

In this class, you will learn through lecture and hands-on practice the skills to handle life-threatening situations you may find your pets in.  You will learn:  Pet First Aid, Pet CPR, Rescue Breathing, appropriate muzzling and restraining of a pet in danger, bleeding protocols, about poisoning, snake bites, heat & cold injuries and more. You will receive a training certificate good for 2 years.
 
Your instructor, Linda Edwards, is the owner of Nana’s Pet Sitting in Charlotte, NC, and a Pet Tech Master Instructor.  Since 2011, Linda has taught the Pet Tech training courses to hundreds of pet owners and pet professionals.
 
This class will be held in the Education Room of the Asheville Humane Society Adoption Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville. The Adoption Center is located off Brevard and Pond Roads near the WNC Farmers Market.
 
Pre-registration is required. The cost of the class is $80. To register, print, complete, and mail the registration form with your check. Download the form below. If you have questions, please call Maripage Grubic at (828) 216-0161.
 

North Carolina Ranks 30th of 50 States in Animal Protection Laws

Screen Shot 2015-12-21 at 1.28.18 PMWhen it comes to animal protection laws, North Carolina has some work to do. The Tenth Annual report from the Animal Legal Defense Fund ranks North Carolina 30th out of 50 states in animal protection laws, which puts the state in the "middle tier." The longest‐running and most authoritative report of its kind, the Rankings Report assesses the strength of each jurisdiction’s animal protection laws by examining over 4,000 pages of statutes.

The best five states for animals, in terms of animal protection laws are (in order): Illinois, Oregon, Maine, California, and Michigan. The worst five states are (in order): North Dakota, Utah, Wyoming, Iowa, and Kentucky. Illinois has been number one for eight years in a row, while Kentucky has been number fifty for nine years in a row.

The good news is a study of the past five years of the Ranking Reports shows more than three quarters of all states and territories have significantly improved their animal protection laws. Still, North Carolina could greatly improve -- and you can help by being proactive in lobbying your state representatives to pass laws that protect all animals. One example of where pressure from citizens is needed is the fact that the North Carolina legislature has yet to pass a bill that effectively regulates puppy mills.

You can download a copy of the Ranking Report, which has useful information about what makes a state "best" and "worst," below. 

Download Rankings-Report-2015


Hiking Hounds - Jan. 10

Hiking houndsIs one of your New Year's resolutions to get more exercise? Then you'll love "Hiking Hounds"!

Hiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Two Sunday mornings each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, January 10. Start time is 10 AM for repeat hikers and 9:30 AM for new hikers. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Dogs in the White House

Screen Shot 2015-11-24 at 3.54.05 PMSeeing as 2016 is the year of a presidential election, Carolina Mountain Dog thought it would be interesting to reflect on the fact that dogs, not just Presidents and First Ladies, have occupied the White House for longer than you might imagine.

According to the Presidential Pet Museum (yes, there is one!), dogs first appeared at the White House during President George Washington's tenure (1789 - 1797). Washington kept twelve hounds and five French hounds at various times. The next president after Washington, President John Adams (1797-1801) and his wife Abigail owned two mixed-breed dogs. Maria Monroe, wife of President James Monroe (1817-1825), owned a spaniel. Next came John Tyler's term (1841 - 1845), during which two wolfhounds and an Italian greyhound were White House occupants.

Plenty of other dogs graced the White House; you can find more about them at the Presidential Pet Museum's website. And just for fun, see if you can match up some of our more recent presidential dogs with their owners.

Here is a list of some presidents:

1. John F. Kennedy
2. Lyndon Johnson
3. Gerald Ford
4. George H. W. Bush
5. Bill Clinton
6. Barack Obama

Here are their dogs, but not in the correct order:

a. Buddy, chocolate lab
b. Millie, English springer spaniel
c. Him and Her, beagles
d. Charlie, Welsh terrier
e. Bo, Portugese water dog
f. Liberty, golden retriever

Find the correct answers here.


New Year's Resolutions for Your Dog

ID-10032214Traditionally, people make all sorts of New Year's resolutions for themselves... but what about dogs? Writing for Care2, Lisa Spector has created a great list, "5 Simple New Year's Resolutions to Improve Your Dog's Life."

Among the five are such suggestions as "Teach your dog a new trick" (a proven way to provide mental stimulation) and "Give her a massage" (canine massage helps reduce stress and aids in recovery from illness and injury).

One of my favorites from Lisa's article that I never would have thought of: "Take a sonic inventory." Lisa writes, "Taking a sonic inventory of your environment is a good way to check for sounds in your house that may be causing stress to your pets. Sound is like air. We rarely notice these two common elements unless the air suddenly becomes polluted or the sound becomes chaotic. The sonic inventory is one way of becoming aware of the noise in your pet’s environment. Simply sit on your sofa with pen and paper in hand. Jot down all of the sounds you hear and rate them from one to 10. Observe your pet’s response to these sounds. Ask yourself how you can make your home a calmer, more peaceful place, for yourself and for your pets. Often, just by listening, we become more sonically aware, an important first step.  Small changes made in your sound environment can often make a big difference in your pet’s behavior."

Read Lisa's entire article here: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-simple-new-years-resolutions-to-improve-your-dogs-life.html