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April 2017

March 2017

"Howl In" at Full Moon Farm, Black Mountain, NC, April 8

Screen Shot 2017-03-04 at 11.01.54 AMFull Moon Farm is an organization dedicated to the well being of the wolfdog (wolf hybrid). Situated on 17 beautiful mountain acres in Black Mountain, NC, the sactuary operates as a not-for-profit organization for abused and refused wolfdogs who find themselves in need of love, shelter, and care through no fault of their own. Full Moon Farm provides a safe haven for animals that cannot be placed into homes for the rest of their lives. 

You have the opportunity to visit this unique farm during the Full Moon Farm "Howl-In" on Saturday, April 8. Gates open at 3 PM and tours of the Farm begin at 3:15 PM.  Potluck supper begins at 5:00 PM.  A $5 donation includes main dish and water/soft drinks. Bring a side dish and join the fun! Visit the Gift Den for handcrafted jewelry and artwork.

For information and directions, call (828) 664-9818 or email info@fullmoonfarm.org (Please note: On the day of the event, it is best to call, as the email account will be unmonitored). 

Image: Full Moon Farm


New Study Shows Dogs Help People Improve Their Interactions

ID-100104783Dog lovers rejoice! Recent research conducted at Central Michigan University compared groups of people working together on tasks. Some small groups worked without a dog present, while other groups had the companionship of a dog. The result: The groups with a dog worked more cooperatively and seemed to trust group members more than the groups with no dog in the room.

Researcher Steve Colarelli reports, "When people work in teams, the presence of a dog seems to act as a social lubricant. Dogs seem to be beneficial to the social interactions of teams."

Colarelli adds, “In a situation where people are working together for a long period of time, and how well the team gets along—do they speak together, have rapport, act cooperatively, help one another—could influence the outcome of the team, then I suspect a dog would have a positive impact.”

Read more about this study from the perspective of Jill Suttie, writing for the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley: 
http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_dogs_help_people_get_along_better?

Image: Vlado, freedigitalphotos.net


ReTail Scene: Aromatherapy for Dogs Now Available in Wipes

Screen Shot 2017-03-08 at 12.28.01 PMA new product, "Canine Calm Aromatherapy Wipes," is designed to calm pets during storms, fireworks, boarding, grooming, clinic visits, and other unsettling times. While aromatherapy is commonly used in sprays and diffusers, the development of therapeutic aromatherapy in convenient, travel-friendly wipes creates a new product category for the industry. The Canine Calm wipes are made with pure essential oils to create a serene experience and come in a re-sealable package.
 
“Aromatherapy has been used for centuries, and scientific studies on the effects of essential oils with dogs and horses were well-established by the mid-1880s in areas of Europe,” Vicki Rae Thorne, founder of Earth Heart Inc., said. “We formulate our products with 100 percent pure essential oils that are developed by an aromatherapist with 25-years of experience to ensure a safe and easy-to-use product for all canine owners.” 
 
A dog’s sense of smell is far more advanced than humans’, and their olfactory memory is remarkable since their world revolves around scents. Dogs can associate scents with calming persons and environments, which is why the use of essential oils and aromatherapy is effective when calming canines in stressful situations.

Canine Calm Aromatherapy Wipes contain the same high-quality, pure essential oils as other Earth Heart Inc. products. The company’s reputation has been built with safety in mind and all of its products, including Canine Calm Aromatherapy Wipes, have been formulated for use as often as needed.

Learn more about this new product from Earth Heart Inc., the creator: http://earthheartinc.com/index.html

Image: Earth Heart Inc.


Tour the Asheville Animal Care Campus - March 25

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Did you know the Animal Care Campus in Asheville is one of the country's leading examples of a private-public partnership in animal welfare? Asheville Humane Society and Buncombe County work in close collaboration to take in, care for, re-home, and adopt out thousands of domestic animals each year. Their collective goal is to save every adoptable animal's life and make each animal's life worth living.

Now you have the opportunity to see first-hand why the Animal Care Campus is a national model. Asheville Humane Society is hosting a guided behind-the-scenes tour of the society's Adoption Center (14 Forever Friend Lane) and the Buncombe County Animal Shelter (16 Forever Friend Lane) on Saturday, March 25, from 1:30 to 2:30 PM. The tour is free and open to the public.

The Animal Care Campus is located on Forever Friend Lane, off Pond Road and Brevard Road, near the WNC Farmers Market. For more information, call (828) 761-2001.


March 23 is National Puppy Day

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In honor of National Puppy Day, March 23, MySweetPuppy.net has published a useful infographic that discusses the benefits of pet adoption, considerations for choosing the right puppy, and puppy care tips for new parents. You'll find the infographic here: http://mysweetpuppy.net/national-puppy-day/ MySweetPuppy.net has all sorts of helpful articles for puppy owners or for anyone thinking of getting a puppy.

To learn more about National Puppy Day and to see puppy photos and videos, visit: http://www.nationalpuppyday.com/

Image: MySweetPuppy.net


Hiking Hounds, Asheville, March 26

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, March 26. Start time is 9 AM for repeat hikers and 8:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 12:30 to 1 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


3 Baked Doggie Treats Perfect for a Mountain Hike

Guest Post by Joe Hughes, the Village Baker

3 Baked Doggy Treats The Carolina mountains are the perfect getaway during the spring and summer months. Beautiful wildflowers grow across the mountains, the Biltmore is teeming with tourists, and the Blue Ridge Mountains are waiting to be explored.

And who better to take with you on a hike or to the top of a mountain than your dog? A walk in nature is all many dogs need to overcome their behavioral problems: digging, chewing, fear of people, etc.

If your pet is afraid of people (mine is), a treat is a good tool to reinforce your dog's good behavior.

You can even bake a few delightful treats using your handy dandy bread maker.

1. Homemade Beef Dog Biscuits

Homemade dog biscuits are a great way to know what your dog is eating. You'll be able to make the same (or better) dog treats you find in the store right in the comfort of your own home. A few necessities before we get started are:

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups wholemeal
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup instant oats
  • 1/2 cup powdered milk
  • 1 tsp. yeast

If you have a bread machine, you can add all the ingredients, starting with the water, and mix until a dough is formed. Sometimes, the humidity in the room will cause the dough to be too dry, and in this case, you'll want to add more water to the mixture.

Knead the dough until smooth and tender.

Roll the dough out, cut into shapes and allow the dough to rise for 30 minutes. You'll want to bake the biscuits for one hour at 325F. Do not give to your pup immediately. Allow the biscuits to cool overnight.

2. Peanut Butter and Parsley Treats

You've planned a trip to the dog park, and now your dog is getting all excited. You'll want to pack some water with you along with dog treats before heading out for the day. Peanut butter and parsley treats are a great option for your pup.

And they smell super good, too.

You'll want to make sure you understand how to bake at higher elevations before proceeding. Water boils faster at higher elevations because of the pressure.

Now, you'll need to grab a few essentials to get the ball rolling:

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup quick rolled oats
  • 1 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup nonfat dry milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. dried parsley

Preheat your oven to 300F and grease a few baking sheets or cover them in parchment paper before beginning.

In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, dried milk, salt, oats and parsley. Add in the eggs and peanut butter, mixing to combine the mixture. You'll have a crumbly consistency at this point. Now, add in the water, adding enough for the dough to come together.

Roll the dough to 1/4" thickness and cut into desired shapes.

Bake for 40 – 60 minutes, or until done.

Allow to cool for an hour before giving to your pet.

3. Chicken Dog Biscuits or Cookies

Dogs love chicken. One of the things I was told was to have a lot of treats available when my mother adopted a dog. A lot of seniors forget how energetic dogs can be, and this leads to dogs barking, chewing and crying.

A treat, or two, can help correct these issues pronto.

Chicken treats are my dog's favorite, and the treat I make is so simple. Place the following ingredients, in this order, into a bread machine:

  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 cup dry milk powder (nonfat)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tsp. Salt
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup instant oatmeal
  • 1 cup flour (all-purpose works well)
  • 1/4 cup cornmeal
  • 3 tbsp. Fresh parsley
  • 1/2 cup of shredded cheese

Select the dough option and hit start to begin mixing the dough. Allow to knead for 5 minutes before removing the dough. Dust your countertop with flour and allow the dough to sit for 15 minutes.

Roll the dough to 1/2" thickness and cut into the desired shape.

Bake for 45 minutes at 250F on a baking sheet covered in parchment paper.

Let cool before serving.

You can also rip off clumps of dough and shape them into balls, bones or any other shape. I promise, your dog won't care what shape the treat is.

Joe Hughes, known by most as the Village Baker, is an expert in homestyle cooking techniques, with a primary interest in baking. He runs the very popular website, http://www.village-bakery.com, which provides the latest homestyle cooking news, techniques, tricks, and recipes. He can be reached at Joe@Village-Bakery.com

Image: Pixabay


Low Cost Vaccinations - Asheville, March 18

Praisaeng-freedigAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Saturday, March 18 from 2 PM to 5 PM at Hall Fletcher Elementary School, 60 Ridgelawn Road, Asheville, NC. No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.

Image: Praisaeng, Freedigitalphotos.net


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, March 19

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, March 19. Start time is 9 AM for repeat hikers and 8:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 12:30 to 1 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


NC Humane Lobby Day - Raleigh, NC, March 21

Screen Shot 2017-02-02 at 11.19.44 AMThere are two kinds of people talking to your lawmakers about animals: those who have the animals’ best interests at heart, and those who do not.

That’s why your attendance at Humane Lobby Day in North Carolina is important. This is your opportunity to talk to your legislators about animal protection issues including stopping puppy mills, prohibiting the private ownership of exotic pets, increasing spay and neuter access and more.

All you need to do is sign up, show up and speak up! If you're new to lobbying, no problem! The Humane Society of the United States will provide all the materials you need.

If you don't tell your legislators that the welfare of animals is important, who will?

Where & When

Tuesday, March 21
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
North Carolina General Assembly, Legislative Building
16 West Jones Street, Raleigh, NC 27601
Cost: Free

The last day to register is March 16. Registration forms must be completed online. Visit www.hsus.org for more information, or click here for the North Carolina registration form.


$5 Adoptions Through March 11 - Asheville

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Asheville Humane Society is offering adoptions at just $5 for 5 days, March 7 through 11. The special adoption fee applies to dogs 25 pounds and over, and cats over 6 months old.

To see available animals, visit www.ashevillehumane.org. Or visit the Adoption Center at 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market). Adoption Center hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. Please note that the public is not permitted to see animals during "nap time," which is 1 to 2 PM.


Dogs and Behavior Problems

ID-100436728We all love our dogs, but every once in a while, they exhibit a behavior that we find undesirable. Before you attempt to correct the behavior, it might be wise to understand its cause.

PetPlace.com provides an excellent "Guide to Behavior Problems in Dogs" that lists many of the most common dog behavior problems, including inappropriate elimination, urine marking, digging, separation anxiety, aggression, chewing, and biting. The guide is set up so that it briefly describes each behavior. Then you can click on the behavior and get a lot more details about the problem.

All of the material is written by veterinarians or other dog behavior specialists. It is easy to read and features specific suggestions and guidance for how to address each behavior problem.

You'll find a link to the primary article here: 
http://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/behavior-training/behavior-problems/guide-to-behavior-problems-in-dogs

Image: Patrisyu, Freedigitalphotos.net


Today, March 7, is Dine to be Kind!

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"Dine to be Kind" is one of the more creative win-win fundraisers. You get to eat out while local animals get a little something extra to help them out! The 14th annual "Dine to be Kind," presented by Dr. David Crouch and Western Carolina Veterinary Surgery, will be held today, Tuesday, March 7.

All you need to do today is eat and drink at one of the dozens of participating area restaurants for breakfast, lunch or dinner (even take-out), and 15% of your bill will be donated to the life saving programs of Asheville Humane Society. In fact, a few restaurants are even generously donating 25%!

So come on, you really wanted to try that restaurant you haven't been to before, or return to one of your favorites... Just be sure to do it today and you'll be helping a great cause as well.

A list of participating restaurants in the Asheville area can be found at: http://ashevillehumane.org/dine-to-be-kind


$5 for 5 Days - Adoptions, Asheville, March 7 - 11

StuartmilesfdpAsheville Humane Society is offering adoptions at just $5 for 5 days, March 7 through 11. The special adoption fee applies to dogs 25 pounds and over, and cats over 6 months old.

To see available animals, visit www.ashevillehumane.org. Or visit the Adoption Center at 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market). Adoption Center hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. Please note that the public is not permitted to see animals during "nap time," which is 1 to 2 PM.

Image: Stuart Miles, freedigitalphotos.net


Tips for Seniors on Adopting a Pet

Guest Post by Jennifer McGregor

ID-10044405A furry friend can provide incredible companionship, especially for empty nesters or widow(er)s. Studies have shown that pets help with depression, can help battle the side effects of dementia, and of course give their owners a sense of responsibility and purpose. Although it’s often recommended for seniors to consider adopting a pet, special considerations need to be addressed first. After all, some pets can be very demanding and high energy—which can be too much of a responsibility for some seniors.

First, consider what kind of pet and breed matches your needs, goals, personality and lifestyle. There are dog breeds best suited for seniors because of their relatively low energy level, low demands, and size. Seniors may want to steer clear of breeds like Huskies which are very high-energy, large in size, and demand an owner who can accommodate their need to run and play.

Cats are generally less demanding than dogs and easier to manage, but even within cat breeds there’s a wide range of personalities. Some seniors want the most affectionate of lap cats who are happy purring away at your side all day, while other owners-to-be are looking for a more independent breed.

There are also exotic and unique pets such as birds, reptiles and even livestock depending on your ability, available space and housing restrictions. Choose your potential pets based on how well they match you, not on their cuteness or immediate availability. Although shelter pets can often be a great choice and are of course in need of a home, make sure their breed characteristics and medical history have been determined first. Some shelters are better at this than others.

Helping Pets Settle

It can take pets awhile to adjust to any new home. Signs of moving-related stress that are often completely normal include anxiety, “acting out,” vomiting and crying. However, these might also be signs of a more serious condition. Adopting a healthy pet is a must for any owner, but especially seniors who might not have the energy or finances to handle a pet in need of immediate veterinary care.

Empathy is paramount to helping new pets settle. What would you want if you were put in a new home without any information? Safety, security, and an easing into the new environment. Don’t push pets to be social faster than they’re ready. Establish routines including mealtimes, where their meals are, where their litter box is or where they ask to go outside to relieve themselves, and offer a small, safe and comfortable space that’s their very own. For many pets, this might be a crate with the door left open.

Pet-Proof Your Home

If it’s been awhile since you’ve shared your home with a pet, you may have forgotten how curious and adventurous they can be. Keep any potential poisonous items in a high or closed cupboard out of their reach. Research which regular household items might be poisonous to a pet but not to you (such as chocolate for dogs and poinsettias for cats). Remove any breakable items that a pet might accidentally knock over—or knock over on purpose! Cats especially are renowned for taking joy in those crashing sounds.

Most importantly, make sure you research a vet and establish a relationship early. Get your new pet into the habit of seeing the vet not just for stressful appointments, but fun ones, too. Many vets offer free or low-cost “sessions” to check weight or blood pressure, simply to get your pet used to traveling to the vet.

Adopting a pet can be a fantastic addition to your golden years. Plus, there are many older pets that are in need of a home and aren’t considered as “adoptable” as their younger friends. However, older pets are often lower energy, already have good habits established, and may have a long history of good health.

Choose your pet wisely, prep your home, and get yourself ready for introducing a new friend to your environment. Soon enough, you’ll wonder how you ever lived without them.

Jennifer McGregor is a pre-med student who loves providing reliable health and medical resources.

Image: Ambro, freedigitalphotos.net


Pet Loss Support Groups in March

PupinframeAsheville, Wednesday, March 1: A pet loss support group meets at 6 PM on the first Wednesday of each month. Location: Jefferson House, 21 Edwin Place (next to the Unitarian Universalist church), Asheville. Donations accepted. Call (828) 254-6001 for additional information.

Waynesville, Wednesday, March 15: A pet loss support group meets from 6 to 7 PM on the third Wednesday of each month. Location: Kimball Counseling, 258 N. Main Street, Suite A, Waynesville. Donations accepted. Registration required. For additional information and to register, call Susan Kimball, LCSW, at (828) 226-7366.

Image: Whittaya Phonsawat, freedigitalphotos.net