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April 2019

Pilates with Puppies - Asheville, May 4

Screen Shot 2017-09-11 at 3.04.01 PMOn Saturday, May 4, Cisco Pilates will hold a "Pilates with Puppies" class from 4 to 5 PM at the Asheville Humane Society Adoption & Education Center, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads near the WNC Farmers Market).

Pilates with Puppies will be a basic Pilates class, with puppies provided by Asheville Humane Society. Please bring your own yoga or Pilates mat and a small towel. Please do not bring your own puppy! The cost is $15, which is a donation to Asheville Humane Society on behalf of Buncombe County animals.

Pre-registration is required and these classes are very popular. Early registration is suggested as space is limited and this event is expected to sell out! Visit https://www.ciscopilates.com/pricing/ to sign up. Questions? Email alexis@ciscopilates.com

Image: Cisco Pilates


Mutt Strut - Greenville, SC, April 27

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This year the Mutts are taking over Main Street in Greenville, South Carolina!

Register now for the 8th Annual Mutt Strut on Saturday, April 27th, benefiting the Greenville Humane Society. Participants will enjoy a 2-mile walk/run through beautiful Downtown Greenville beginning at 550 South Main St. in front of Halls Chophouse.

Following immediately after, the Mutt Market festival and after party will take place on South Main Street between the Army Navy Store and Mary's Cottage. The streets will be lined with entertainment including live music, free pizza from presenting sponsor Papa Johns, caricature artists, face painters and sponsor tents with plenty of awesome giveaways! Participants over the age of 6 will also receive a swag bag filled with goodies and a race t-shirt. Don't forget! All proceeds from the Mutt Strut go to benefit the animals of the Greenville Humane Society.

For more information visit: http://www.ghsmuttstrut.com/


Low Cost Vaccination Clinic - Asheville, April 27

AHS Low Cost VaccinationsAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Saturday, April 27 from 11 AM to 2 PM at Emma Elementary School, 37 Brickyard Road, Asheville, NC 28806. No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.


Doggie Ice Cream Social - W. Asheville, April 25

Screen Shot 2017-06-26 at 9.33.58 AMGreg, who owns The Hop, doesn't just make fabulous ice cream, he's also a confirmed dog lover who does a lot for local humane efforts. Come on out and say thanks to Greg -- and enjoy some human and doggie ice cream at a special Doggie Ice Cream Social at The Hop Ice Creamery, 167 Haywood Road, West Asheville.

The Doggie Ice Cream Social will be held on Thursday, April 25 from 3 to 8 PM. Drop in any time. Greg will be opening up the outdoor space at The Ice Creamery to any and all leashed dogs (and their owners) who would like to join in. Happy Tails Doggie Ice Cream, an exclusive of The Hop, as well as ice cream of the human variety will be on the menu. (Note: This location is different from The Hop West ice cream cafe.) A portion of the proceeds will benefit Asheville Humane Society.


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, April 28

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, April 28.  Start time is 9 AM for repeat hikers and 8:30 AM for new hikers. Hikes are typically 3-5 miles at a brisk pace with elevation changes and provide vigorous exercise for our volunteer hikers as well. They do not cancel hikes because of rain, as our pups don’t mind getting wet. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM.

Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com. Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first serve basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. If you don’t get an email from Hiking Hounds, assume they didn’t get yours! Please be sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Tails and Trails Hike - Bearwallow Mountain, NC, April 27

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WANTED: STRONG LEGS, POSITIVE ATTITUDES, WAGGING TAILS

Bring your best human or non-human buddy (better yet, both) with you on Saturday, April 27, at 10:00 AM, for a charity hike up Bearwallow Mountain, nineteen miles from Asheville on the way to Lake Lure and Chimney Rock.  Climb the one mile hike up to the beautiful, bald summit of Bearwallow Mountain with fellow conservation loving pet owners to take in the breathtaking views with your furry buddy.

Proceeds benefit Conserving Carolina and Blue Ridge Humane Society in Hendersonville. The registration fee is $20 and includes an event shirt.

Check-in will begin at 9:30 AM at the trail head. All participants–humans and their furry friends–must check in prior to the start of the hike. Register by filling out the form below. Proceeds benefit Conserving Carolina & Blue Ridge Humane Society. The registration is $20 and includes an event shirt. Once you register, please check your email for more details as we get closer to the event.

For more information visit: https://www.blueridgehumane.org/get-involved/fundraising-events/tails/
If you have questions, contact Laura at lrice@blueridgehumane.org or 828-692-2639.


"Adopt Them All" - $10 Adoptions through April 30!

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Calling all Pet Avengers! Your superpower is SAVING LIVES!! Asheville Humane Society is currently full of canines needing a superhero to provide them with a second chance... and a home of their own. YOU can save the day!

Now through APRIL 30th adoption fees for ALL animals age 6 months and up will be just $10! The pets in need have a superpower of their own to offer in return... priceless love!

Although the love of a pet is priceless, all of the following are still included when you adopt! Each adoption fee includes spay/neuter, all up-to-date vaccines, behavioral training when appropriate, microchip and free 1-year registration, a free starter bag of food, and a free wellness visit with a participating veterinarian. 

To see available animals, visit www.ashevillehumane.org. The Adoption Center is located at 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market). It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 AM to 6 PM (Tuesdays until 7 PM). The dog and cat rooms are closed daily for naptime from 1 to 2 PM, giving animals a much-needed break. The lobby remains open where you can speak with staff, enjoy refreshments, read or watch videos!

Can't adopt? Please spread the word!


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, April 21

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, April 21.  Start time is 9 AM for repeat hikers and 8:30 AM for new hikers. Hikes are typically 3-5 miles at a brisk pace with elevation changes and provide vigorous exercise for our volunteer hikers as well. They do not cancel hikes because of rain, as our pups don’t mind getting wet. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM.

Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com. Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first serve basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. If you don’t get an email from Hiking Hounds, assume they didn’t get yours! Please be sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


"Dog City" Asheville Featured in Washington Post

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An article last month in The Washington Post sang the praises of Asheville as "Dog City USA." It's written from the perspective of dog owner Melanie D.G. Kaplan, who brought her dog Hamilton to Asheville for a visit. "In just two hours, this mountain town in Western North Carolina blew his little beagle mind," writes Kaplan.

Kaplan says "Asheville is nirvana for dogs and humans who love the outdoors... I learned that this progressive city is canine-friendly in ways that go far beyond biscuits." She took "Hammy" on a dog-friendly tour offered by The Dog Door that stopped at Three Dog Bakery, ZaPow, Tasty Beverage Co., and Catawba Brewing -- all welcoming to dogs. Hammy also enjoyed "a gorgeous meal of diced carrots, sweet potato, zucchini and salmon" prepared by the Twisted Laurel restaurant.

Read more about Kaplan's experiences here. Aren't we lucky to live in "Dog City"?


Moving? How to Ease Your Dog into a New Home

Guest Post by Cindy Aldridge

Screen Shot 2019-04-05 at 11.16.08 AMMaking the transition into a new home comes with many challenges. You might be in a new neighborhood and new city, with a new job, and trying to get your house in order. For anyone, it’s a lot to take in, and it can often become overwhelming.

This change is just as disorienting for your dog. Keep him safe and secure by following a few basic tips for a stress-free transition. The first step toward easing your dog into a new home is keeping him calm leading up to the move. If he’s already disoriented and anxious by the time you get to your new home, it might make things more difficult.

Before the Move

Here are a few things you should do before moving to ease your dog’s transition:

  • Keep his routine. On the days leading up to the move, keep your dog’s feeding and walking times as consistent as possible.
  • Maintain his exercise. Keeping your dog exercised and tired will help reduce stress and subdue anxiety, which can often manifest in a variety of ways.
  • Get his records. Make sure your dog has all his shots and is wearing identification. If he should wander out into the new neighborhood, this will make him easier to find.

In the New Home

Pay attention and monitor your dog’s behavior. A common mistake is to simply let your dog loose in a strange house or yard. Introduce him slowly to the perimeter and walk along with him.

If you think your dog is acting strange or funny, it’s important that you’re aware of it and address it as soon as possible. Some common signs of stress include a loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and incessant barking. Ways to ease your dog into the transition include:

  • Encourage routine. As soon as you move in, establish or continue known routines for your dog. This keeps his life structured and helps with stress.
  • Keep his old toys. Familiar smells help dogs feel safe and secure. Keeping his old blankets and toys gives him a sense of home.
  • Give him attention. According to The Bark magazine, giving your dog lots of love will make him feel comfortable. Also, help your dog adjust to his new home by playing with him throughout the house and yard.
  • Plenty of exercise. Just like playtime, exercise and regular walks will ensure your dog is tired and releases accumulated energy.
  • Walk him in the neighborhood. After you have looked up the specific laws regarding pets in your neighborhood, show him around the neighborhood so that he becomes familiar with smells and sounds of the new place.

When you’re settling in with your dog, it’s also important to address the quality of air inside your new place. After all, clean air helps keep us happy and relaxed, and our pets, as much as we love them, can unintentionally contribute allergens on a regular basis. So, consider trying out an air purifier to reduce the amount of dander and pet hair floating throughout your home. Air purifiers come in all shapes and sizes, so make sure you know which one to purchase by reading through online guides and best-of lists before you make up your mind.

Fence Safety and Tips

Before you leave your dog alone in the new yard, make sure to check for places that might present a danger or allow your dog to escape. According to the Humane Society, dogs commonly escape due to isolation and boredom. This can present a problem in a new environment if your dog is left alone right away.

Robert Frost said, “Good fences make good neighbors.” This especially applies to dogs and dog owners. Installing a new fence may be necessary. You want to consider a fence that is appropriate and safe for your four-legged friend. Assess your dog’s tendencies and consider his ability to jump and dig. The investment is worthwhile if it ensures your dog’s safety and helps him feel comfortable. It might also solve problems of excessive barking and keep your dog safely confined when he’s alone. And while you’re at it, make sure you have an up-to-date ID tag and a reliable GPS tracker in case your pooch does manage to break free from your yard. Having both will help you to find your friend as soon as possible.

Dogs are territorial animals and can be very sensitive to a change of environment. Some extra consideration can go a long way and make the transition smooth and stress-free. In just a few weeks, your dog will be adjusted and back to his old self.

Photo Credit: Unsplash

Cindy Aldridge is passionate about dogs and pets and loves sharing her thoughts and insights on being a responsible dog owner. When she isn’t busy writing, she spends all her time with her two fluffy golden retrievers. Check out her website: http://ourdogfriends.org/


Angel Pets Conference and Expo - Asheville, June 8

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The Angel Pets Conference and Angel Pets Expo will take place on Saturday, June 8, at the Renaissance Hotel, 31 Woodfin Street, Asheville.

The Conference will run from 8 AM to 5 PM in Salon A at the Renaissance Hotel. This pioneering, unique, and much needed, conference covers many topics on senior pet care needs, end-of-life care, caregiver support and grief healing. The Angel Pets Conference highlights important medical topics for senior animal needs and resources, assessing animal quality-of -life, explaining animal hospice and palliative care, covering the medical, practical, emotional considerations for pets at the end-of-life transition. Special focus will also be on grief healing from pet loss for ourselves and family, which is often complex and under-addressed in our society.

The Conference is a seated, educational, ticketed event, ideal for pet parents and pet professionals. Some presentations offer CE credits. Speakers include expert local area veterinarians, internationally recognized pet loss specialists Beth Marchitelli DMV (4PawsFarwell); Coleen Ellis, CT, CPLP (TwoHeartsPetLossCenter), Dr. Kasandra Garner, DVM (Animal Hospital of North Asheville) and more. Conference schedule, program description, speaker bios, and ticket information can be found at https://angelpetsconference.com/

The Expo will be from 10 AM to 6 PM in Salons B/C at the Renaissance Hotel. The Expo is open to the public for a $5 admission charge. There will be 45+ vendors specializing in services and products for pets, senior pet care needs, end-of-life, caregiver support, grief healing and other pet supportive topics. Select featured vendor presentations will be held throughout the day.


Dine to be Kind and Drink to be Kind - Asheville, Apr. 9 and 11

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Join Asheville Humane Society for the 16th Annual Dine To Be Kind on Tuesday, April 9, a day of dining out to help local animals in need. Participating restaurants will donate a portion of their proceeds to Asheville Humane Society.

Mark your calendar and plan to dine out for breakfast, lunch, dinner...or all three (take out is included)! Stay tuned for a list of participating restaurants.

This year, Asheville Humane Society is adding an extra "day to be kind" for the beer lovers of the community. During the new Drink to be Kind on Thursday, April 11, participating breweries will donate a portion of their sales to local animals in need.

Enjoy happy hour at your favorite brewery and help homeless animals at the same time! Stay tuned for a list of participating breweries.

More information, plus a list of restaurants and breweries, here: https://ashevillehumane.org/dine-to-be-kind


10 Fun Activities that Will Keep Your Dog (and You) Healthy

Guest Post by Sadi Khan

Dogs activitiesDogs need exercise and physical activities as much as humans do. It keeps them happy and healthy (both physically and mentally). This is why it is not enough to just take your dog out for a walk. You are missing out on a lot of fun and health benefits if that’s the only thing you do with your dog.

Let’s have a look at some healthy ways to have fun with your dog. 

1. Running

Running has a never-ending list of benefits for you and your dog. It improves cardiovascular health, keeps obesity at bay, improves mood, and boosts mental health. You cannot get the same benefits from walking because running is more intense and uses different muscles. You will also see an improvement in your dog’s behavior because running will help him burn a lot of energy. You can do a short, light paced jog with any breed, but active breeds like terriers or shepherds can run relatively long distances as well.

2. Hiking

Walking or running with your dog in the neighborhood is great but you might get bored after doing it consecutively for a few days. The best way to deal with this monotony is to change the terrain and go hiking. There are some really good options in Western North Carolina and the Upstate, including trails along the Blue Ridge Parkway and in the Bent Creek Experimental Forest. Search the web to find a dog-friendly trail near you. Hiking will be a great experience for dogs who naturally want to explore.

3. Cycling

If you are not much into running, you can ride a bike and use a biking leash to have your dog tag along. It is a great workout for big, strong dogs and they will be less destructive at home. Mountain biking is also an option (without a leash). However, you need to make sure your dog is young and fit enough to take part in this exercise. It can be too exhausting for young puppies, very old, or small dogs to run while you ride a bike. Choose a cool time of the day and do it only for a short period.

4. Go to a dog park

There are great dog parks in Western North Carolina, such as Azalea Park and French Broad Dog Park in Asheville and the Morris Broadband Dog Park in Bill Moore Community Park in Fletcher. You and your dog will enjoy the outdoor time without a leash, and you can just sit and watch your dog play with other dogs. (Always keep an eye out for rough play, however, especially if you are not familiar with the other dogs.) Used appropriately, a dog park can be a great socializing experience for both dogs and their owners.

5. Play hide and seek

If you are looking for a fun activity that is less of an exercise and more of a game, then hide and seek is a great option. Initially, your dog will need some training (and treats) but once he gets the hang of it, it can be a lot of fun. It will improve your dog’s mental health, problem-solving, and recall skills.

6. Play fetch

Dogs of all sizes, breeds, and ages already know how to play fetch. As hunting animals, it comes to them naturally. This activity is also a great way to interact and build a bond with a new dog.

7. Dancing

This might come as a surprise but you can actually try dancing with your dog. It is a great cardio exercise if the weather or neighborhood doesn’t allow for running or biking. It will also build flexibility, stamina, and agility in dogs. You can follow tips and tutorials online or join a proper class, especially if you want to take part in some competition.

Don’t be so hard on them though. Not every dog can move it like Pudsey.

8. Events or competitions

You can find a lot of dog-friendly events and competitions, like dog races, disc dog, or dock jumping. You can also participate in one of these dog-friendly races. You will get to meet many dog owners, learn about other dogs, and discover lots of new products. Some of these canine-friendly events are meant for charities, so you will have fun while supporting a good cause. 

9. Swimming

During the summer, you can take your dog for a regular swim. Dogs can get irritated with the summer heat because they do not sweat and cool down like humans. It will take some time before they learn to swim, but once they do, most dogs will enjoy every bit of it. And it will be a great workout.

10. Traveling

Traveling is one of the best ways to break free from a grinding routine and have some fun. Research confirms that leisure traveling can reduce your chances of a heart attack or developing cardiovascular diseases. Traveling with your dog is easier than ever because of all the dog-friendly accommodations available. Your dog can be especially great company if you are traveling alone and you will feel more secure traveling with him.

All these fun activities will help you and your dog live a happy, healthy life. Just make sure you have discussed any regular exercise with your vet before starting.

Image provided by author.

Sadi Khan is a research analyst and fitness blogger at Runrepeat.com. He believes regular exercise is crucial to your own health and the health of your dogs.


Prime Paws Dog Walk, Spartanburg, SC, April 13

Screen Shot 2019-03-05 at 2.25.47 PMJoin Spartanburg Humane Society on Saturday, April 13, 2019 for the Prime Paws Fun Dog Walk!

On-site registration begins at 8:00 am and the start time is 9:00 am. The Prime Paws Fun Dog Walk will benefit the Spartanburg Humane Society and the Lyman United Methodist Church Senior Prime Time Group.

The registration fee is $25 per dog and each participant will receive a Prime Paws T-Shirt , 2 bandanas, and a picture with their canine friend. The fun will be had on the walking track located beside Lyman Methodist Church, directly across the street from the former back entrance to the Mill.

Come out and have a fun time with your canine friend as you walk for exercise while raising money for good causes.

For more information and to register, visit: https://spartanburghumane.org/primepawsdogfunwalk/