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April 2020

Angel Pets Expo - Fletcher, NC, May 2

Screen Shot 2020-01-09 at 2.53.51 PM
Note: Originally a live event, the Angel Pets Expo will now be held online on Saturday, May 2 from 10 AM to 4 PM. For details, visit https://angelpetsexpo.com/ or  https://www.facebook.com/Angel-Pets-Expo-2020-107132260835473/.

Angel Pets Expo has a holistic focus and prides itself on inclusion of all things pet and all stages of pet life and relationship including Young pet care, Adult pet, Senior Pet Care, end-of-life care and healing from pet loss. The Angel Pets Expo is…ALL THINGS PET! There will be vendors and presentations.

For more information and to buy tickets, visit: https://angelpetsexpo.com/


How to Train Your Dog to Treasure Hunt for Truffles

Guest Post by Thomas Quarry

3370261961_d84b2498c9_cDescription: When you and your dog go on a treasure hunt to find natures gold, a.k.a. Truffles, they’re not going to find anything unless they have had adequate training. We explain how to train your puppy or dog to find truffles outside.

What can be more fun than you and your dog deciphering proverbial treasure hunt clues to reach truffle success? Truffle hunting is the ultimate treasure hunt where each piece of fungus can earn you a hefty sum of money. It’s unlike finding common mushrooms in your local woods -- these organisms are elusive and other truffle treasure hunters find it extremely difficult to locate these bad boys of the woods.

Truffles are notoriously difficult to acquire, especially because they live underground and you can’t find them in the same place twice. They survived by forming a relationship between tree root networks and plates have been used to hunt them for years. Truffle hunters have recently been switching from pigs to dogs because pigs are prone to eat the truffles, gobbling up potential hundreds of dollars’ worth of goods in one go! We suggest that one of the best treasure hunt ideas you can have is to train a dog instead. At least they’re not going to eat the prize like if they were on a prey treasure hunt.

Setting Tasks for Your Dog

You can train any dog to find nature’s treasure hunt clues, but the best dogs are those that love sniffing out the soil. Before you start, get your hands on some good quality truffle oil that is not synthetic and thus has the real stuff in it. Most truffle oil that you find in the shops isn’t actually made from truffles and the scent is artificially produced. It can help and can be used in training situations, but oil made from truffles or better yet shards of truffles make for a more realistic scent.

Make sure that you’ve got a number of treats armed at the ready. You will need to reward your dog for any good action that they complete. You will also want to get some cotton balls soaked with truffle oil which you can use in the training scenarios. We’re going to look at two of the most common methods and find out how you can apply them in the hunt game. It’s a game that’s worth winning as the prize is lucrative.

The “Puppy” Method

Step 1
Get your dog familiar with the scent of truffles by applying some oil to the puppy’s mother’s teats so they can familiarize themselves with it from a young age.

Step 2
When the dog gets older and can start to walk around constantly, soak a cotton ball with some truffle oil. You can then play fetch with your dog so they start to associate fetching for things that smell like truffles.

Step 3
Repeat steps until your puppy can bring the ball back to you without coaxing.

Step 4
You can begin to hide the soaked ball and reward your dog when they have found it.

Step 5
Repeat step four but hide the ball in difficult-to-reach places. You can try burying it in the soil to emulate natural truffle hunting conditions.

Step 6
After consecutive repetitions, go out into the forest where truffles might be and try to find some.

The “Find” Method

Step 1
Introduce the truffle to your dog so that they can familiarize themselves with the scent. If you can’t get a real truffle, then soak cotton balls in truffle oil instead. Introduce these cotton balls to them throughout your training.

Step 2
When the balls are introduced to your dog, ingrain the keyword “find” into their minds as they sniff around.

Step 3
Bury some truffle-infused balls to emulate real-life conditions. This is one of the best things the secret treasure hunter can do. You can then see if your dog will find the balls out in the field.

Step 4
Once the dog has successfully located the balls, reward them with a treat.

Step 5
Repeat, repeat and then repeat again. Repetition is key to your dog becoming a truffle master.

Treasure Hunt Truffles Today

Hopefully, now you know how to organize a treasure hunt with your best friend by your side. The truffle hunt can be one of the most exciting pastimes and it will be thoroughly rewarding when you find some of these wonderful fungi buried in the dirt. It isn’t easy to train your dog up properly but stick with it and you will reap the rewards in the long run. All the best!

What dog breeds do you think make the best truffle treasure hunters? Tell us in the comments section below.

Editor's Note: In case you don't think you can find truffles in the U.S., think again! Read this article on CNN and you'll be surprised.

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Thomas Quarry loves a good treasure hunt, even at his age. Just because you reach the age of 50, doesn’t mean you need to stop going out and looking for treasure! Everybody can do it and Thomas loves to write about the subject. His passion for finding lost treasure has led him to explore the correlation between data, new technology, and the finding of lost treasure and cities. When he’s not writing articles, he’s always mucking around with antique cars in his garage. A pet hobby he has is restoring them.

Image: Flickr.com


Is Grain-Free Food Safe for Your Dog?

Golden-retriever-puppy-2706672_1920Grain-free dog food is very popular: By 2017, it accounted for nearly half (44 percent) of the dog food market. Yet there have been concerns about grain-free food expressed by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) as recently as February 2019

The Doggypedia has published an authoritative article about grain-free food. It contains the following information:

  • What is a grain-free dog diet?
  • The growing popularity of grain-free diets
  • Connection to allergies
  • What is dilated cardiomyopathy(DCM)?
  • Genetic predisposition to DCM
  • DCM Signs
  • Why the FDA is investigating a grain-free dog diet
  • Is grain-free food safe for your dog?
  • What should dog owners do now?

Check out this free resource here: https://thedoggypedia.com/should-you-feed-your-dog-grain-free-dog-food/

Image: Pixabay.com

 


The Difference Between American and European Dogs

People-4070864_1920Dogs are dogs, right? Well, yes -- but their owners are different, and the differences are very obvious when you compare American and European dogs. So obvious, in fact, that Certified Trick Dog Instructor Sassafras Lowrey wrote all about it for The New York Times. Here are some of her observations.

  • When she visited England, France, Germany and the Netherlands, she noticed something quite different from America -- "dogs were everywhere: restaurants and buses and performance venues and countless other places. ...In Europe dogs tend to be welcome in most public spaces and they are calm, relaxed and quiet there. In the United States, however, pet dogs aren’t welcome in most public spaces, and often struggle in the public places where they are allowed."
  • Lowrey spoke to professional dog trainer Kama Brown, who observed that in Europe, “a person walking with a dog is not seen as an invitation to socialize. Whereas in America, moving across the street to avoid another owner and dog, or not allowing dogs to interact who are passing each other on a walk, can be seen as antisocial.”
  • Even the way we train dogs is different, writes Lowrey: "For example, shock collars, sometimes called e-collars or electronic collars, are banned in the United Kingdom, but they are legal in the United States."

All things for American dog owners to think about!

Image: Pixabay.com


Results from a Pet Parenting Survey

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How good a pet parent are you? Porch.com surveyed over 1,000 people to learn whether men or women think their pets are more attached to them, how often couples argue over pet-related responsibilities, and how many people modify their homes for the sake of their furry family.

Here are some of the results:

  • Over half of women (54.7%) and men (52.4%) say they're "equally good" pet parents as their partners.
  • Women seem to be more confident pet parents: 44.2% of women said they were their pet's favorite parent, while only 35.8% of men said they were their pet's favorite parent.
  • 1 in 5 (20%) of pet parents said they get jealous when their pet pays their partner more attention.
  • Women were twice as likely as men to say they do more for their pet than their partner.
  • Couples who live with both cats and dogs were the most likely to share pet-related responsibilities equally.
  • 64% of respondents had added home features specifically for their pet(s).

Check out more results and information here: https://porch.com/resource/whos-better-pet-parent


Everything You Need to Know About CBD Oil for Dogs

Guest Post by Chele

Dog-4432830_1920Description: CBD oil has taken the health and wellness industry by storm. It’s natural that healthy-lifestyle loving people would want to share their new-found diet supplements with their pets. And so, CBD oil for dogs appeared.

What Is CBD Oil For Dogs?

CBD or Cannabidiol is a compound found in hemp - a type of cannabis plant. Being legal in 50 states in the US, hemp is unlike its sister compound, marijuana, and does not cause intoxication. CBD was extracted from hemp to create all-natural health products for humans initially, but now you can find CBD oil for dog products as well. There are many benefits that supplementing with CBD oil for dog products can bring to your best friend’s diet. Let’s take a look at what CBD oil is used for specifically.

Benefit 1: Anxiety 

CBD oil for anxiety is a well-known treatment among humans, and it’s no different among canines either. If your little furry friend is a shelter-dog and has a history of abuse (which causes anxiety), CBD oil is likely to be a great treatment. Likewise, if your dog gets stressed about car trips, going on trains, visits to the vet, or anything else - a CBD oil for dogs product is a good choice. It is a well-known fact that CBD oil for dogs supplements can help with general neurological health and emotional well-being. 

Benefit 2: Cancer

Wow, not holding back here, are we? Well, there are whispers that one of the CBD oil benefits is that it can help with the treatment of this serious disease. This is a MASSIVE claim, and definitely too serious for this article (please consult a veterinarian). We’re just reporting that ‘yes, indeed’, using CBD oil for dogs with cancer has been claimed as an option. 

Benefit 3: Immune System

The CBD origin came into the health industry because of its anti-inflammatory benefits and the ability to help stimulate the immune system. So, CBD oil for dogs is great for supporting, healthy heart, joint, and skin function. An all-round winner!

How To Administer CBD Oil For Dogs

Your fur-babies can get their dose of CBD in a variety of ways. There are capsules and droppers as standard, but some dogs might refuse to take the supplement in this way due to taste. Most pet shops stock CBD-infused treats, so you can feed your dog the supplement, like any other medicine. Lastly, there are topical options for CBD oil for dogs. If you’re looking to target their fur, skin, and joints, topical cream or oil might be the best option.

Doses Of CBD Oil For Dogs

Before you even let your pet near any CBD, please consult a qualified veterinarian. Supplying information about dosage sizes for your fur-baby is beyond this article. We’re just providing some general information here so you can kick-off on your own research hunt. Just as with all medicines and supplements, our preference is to start off at a low dosage and increase it slowly over-time.

Side Effects Of CBD Oil For Dogs

Unwanted side effects of all CBD oil products for dogs are rare, but they can occur. Your furry friend might experience dry mouth, vomiting, lethargy, depression, tremors, and lowered blood pressure. Some of these side effects might be initial teething problems as your dog adjusts to the supplement. If side effects continue, it would be advisable to take a SECOND visit to your veterinarian after the initial consultation and agreement with the supplementing.

Final Thoughts On CBD Oil For Dogs

Overall, the jury is still out on how powerful CBD actually is for health benefits - even in humans. Sure, studies suggest that it’s a great anti-oxidant for both humans and dogs - and helps as an anti-inflammatory tool in our bodies.

We’re interested to know, have you started CBD oil for dogs supplementation? And, if so, how’s it going? Has your pet enjoyed any of the positive effects that we’ve described here and none of the negative ones? Reply in the Comments section to let Carolina Mountain Dog know your experiences.

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Chele is a pet shop owner from Blackpool, UK. She writes a weekly newsletter for her online customers and is well-known and liked in the local community. There’s nothing that Chele likes more than going for walks along the Blackpool beach in winter with her dogs.

Image: Pixabay.com


Can a Dog Detect Covid-19?

Fuca-2491995_1920We dog lovers know just how special dogs are -- and we also know that they serve humanity in many noble ways.

Now, United Kingdom researchers are testing the idea that dogs can detect Covid-19. According to an article in Bloomberg's CITYLAB, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) is forging ahead with the project with high hopes. Will it work? "There’s a good chance that it will," writes Feargus O'Sullivan. "Dogs are already widely used to detect the presence of cancers, bacterial superbugs and neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s. Working with the charity Medical Detection Dogs, the LSHTM has previously carried out a successful training program that demonstrated dogs could detect malaria, creating a test that exceeded required World Health Organization standards."

The head of LSHTM's Department of Disease Control, James Logan, says “We know diseases have odors —  including respiratory diseases such as influenza — and that those odors are in fact quite distinct. There is a very, very good chance that Covid-19 has a specific odor, and if it does I am really confident that the dogs would be able to learn that smell and detect it.”

Read more about it here: https://www.citylab.com/life/2020/04/coronavirus-no-symptoms-dogs-smell-detect-covid-19-infection/609403/

Image: Pixabay.com


Coronavirus Update from Watauga Humane Society

Screen Shot 2020-04-09 at 12.45.37 PMDear Friends of Watauga Humane Society,

In response to growing concerns about the spread of COVID-19, the Watauga Humane Society and Watauga County Animal Control are closely monitoring recommendations from public health officials about possible changes of how we do our work or deliver programs to provide services to lost, homeless, injured and sick animals in our community. 

Currently, over 150 animals are sheltered at WHS in the care of our amazing team of dedicated staff. Should this team be affected by this virus, the care of the animals would suffer. Procedures are being put into practice to insure that our staff remains healthy.

WHS has elected to temporarily limit the amount of possible exposure to the COVID-19, effective immediately. Beginning Tuesday, March 17th, access for the general public to the building will be limited to scheduled appointments only. No unscheduled drop-in visitation of animals will be available.

Animals available for adoption/foster may be viewed on our website in real time and anyone interested in adopting is encouraged to browse the website, then call to schedule an appointment for a meet and greet with a specific animal. (828)-264-7865. 

To fill out our Foster Application, click here https://bit.ly/3b1mxFI

To fill out our Adoption Application, click here https://bit.ly/2TW7gju

Owner surrenders have always been by appointment and will continue to be done this way.

If pets are lost, owners are encouraged to complete lost/found pet reports on our website so the pets can be listed on our website.

Animal Control Officers will still be responding to emergency calls, but non-emergency calls will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. (828) 262 -1672

To contact WHS during this time, or if you have found a stray animal, email us at information@wataugahumanesociety.org or call (828) 264-7895.

Our animals and staff ask that anyone experiencing illness or those with a high risk of having been exposed to COVID-19 avoid visiting the shelter at this time.

These procedures will be in place until further notice.

Sincerely,

Alice Roess, WHS President


Important Information from Asheville Humane Society

Screen Shot 2020-03-26 at 9.42.00 AMIn alignment with the state of North Carolina's Stay at Home Order related to COVID-19, Asheville Humane Society's Adoption Center and the Buncombe County Animal Shelter will remain closed to the public through April 29, 2020.

Community Assistance Available

Asheville Humane’s Community Solutions Department has started a delivery system for pet food and supplies to residents in need and to food pantries.  We’re also continuing to offer owner surrender counseling to try to keep pets with their people during this difficult time.

Buncombe County residents should email helpline@ashevillehumane.org or call our Safety Net Helpline at (828) 760-2008 if they need assistance with their pets.

Animal emergencies or found pets should be directed to the animal control agency that serves the area where the animal is located.


Your Dog Loves Having You at Home

Girl-1160441_1920Is there a happy side to this global coronavirus crisis? Yes -- for dogs at least. Scientist/author Alexandra Horowitz writes in The New York Times that "Unless owners are able to work from home, or their home is their work, their sociable canids must stay captive and alone for the majority of their days. Now, the coronavirus quarantine, by imposing similar hardship on us, is actually giving dogs something that they’ve deserved all along: more of our companionship."

She continues, "So what should we do with our dogs, now that we find ourselves in their near-constant company, eyeballed by them as we move through our homes? For now, at least, we still ought to walk them outdoors: We can all use the fresh air, and the dogs, at least, can collect the smells of the day. Some countries have reached the point where all movement outside is restricted, but even in those places walking the dog is allowed as an essential exemption.

If you’re worried that your dogs — like doorknobs — may be touched by people who are infected, bathe them with soap after the walk."

That's right -- dogs are happy to have you around, and you can feel a lot better taking them for a (socially distant) walk. Get out there, get some fresh air and stay safe!

Image: Pixabay.com 


Blue Ridge Humane Offers Assistance with Pets

Screen Shot 2020-03-31 at 3.12.34 PMThe following information is reprinted from the828.com as a public service.

Blue Ridge Humane Society is helping pet owners facing hospitalization and financial troubles ensure their companions are cared for, by offering several community resources.

Pet Helpline: You can reach the BRHS Pet Helpline at 828-393-5832. Leave a message and a staffer will be in touch. You can call with concerns about keeping your pet, vet assistance, litter box problems, housing issues, dog training tips, stray neighborhood cats, suspected abuse/neglect, and other issues. You can also submit behavior questions online, and get help from the Training and Behavior Manager.

  • Re-Homing: For owners that have found themselves in the unfortunate situation of having to find a new home for their pet, the Humane Society urges them to try re-homing. This takes the load off the local animal shelter and keeps the animal out of a shelter environment, allowing limited resources to be used for other animals like stays or abuse cases. BRHS has partnered with Adopt-a-Pet.com to provide a courtesy re-homing listing for those who would like to find a loving home for a pet without surrendering them to an animal shelter. If you are considering adopting, check the Re-Homing listing as well as your local shelter.
  • Community Pet Food Assistance: Blue Ridge Humane Society has partnered with local food banks, helping them to supply  litter, pet food or treats to their clients. By making pet food more accessible, it is our hope that members of our community will no longer have to worry about feeding their furry family members. To find a list of participating banks, click here.

  • Emergency Vet Assistance: Though us not able to assist with existing medical bills, BRHS offers Emergency Veterinary Assistance in times of economic distress. It can provide medical vouchers to assist with emergency veterinary visits prior to your visit.  If you would like more information or to find out if you qualify, call 828-393-5832. You can find a listing of additional assistance groups online as well.

  • BRHS Lost and Found Pet Facebook Group: Join the BRHS Lost and Found Pet Facebook group. This group allows you to not only post if your pet is lost but also help reunite any pets you may find that have become separated from their families and keep pets in temporary loving home while waiting to be reunited with their owner.

  • Spay/Neuter Incentive Program: With support from the City of Hendersonville and with support and collaboration from Henderson County, Blue Ridge Humane Society is able to offer low cost spay-neuter as part of our Spay-Neuter Incentive Program or SNIP. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you cannot schedule an appointment at this time, but you can complete a request for an appointment on our website. The SNIP Coordinator will be in touch when normal scheduling resumes.  Pet owners must be residents of Henderson County in order to get their animals spayed or neutered through the program. SNIP. To learn more or submit an appointment click here.

If you don’t need any pet assistance, the Blue Ridge Humane Society is requesting you share this information with someone who might. You can also help by signing up to volunteer, or by making a donation online, or by calling 828-692-2639.


Information for Buncombe County Pet Owners

Screen Shot 2020-03-31 at 3.17.53 PMThis information is reprinted from AshevilleHumane.org as a public service.

In alignment with Buncombe County's "Stay Home, Stay Safe" declaration, related to COVID-19, effective Friday, March 27, 2020, Asheville Humane Society's Adoption Center and the Buncombe County Animal Shelter will be closed to the public through April 8, 2020, unless rescinded earlier or extended further by Buncombe County or the state of North Carolina.  
 
Be assured that we will have essential staff available to feed, clean, and provide enrichment for the animals currently in our care. While we continue our commitment to the people and animals of Buncombe County, we see the importance of limiting face-to-face interactions and complying with all aspects of this declaration. 
 
What does this mean for our community?

Adoptions:  

Wishing to adopt? Please view all available animals on the website. If you see an animal you are interested in, please email us at adoptions@ashevillehumane.org or call 828-761-2001 x312. We will give you all of the information that we have on that pet. If you want to adopt, we will note you as an Interested Party. Please note this will be on a first come, first served basis. Once operations resume, you will be able to come in and meet your new pet and make a final decision to adopt. 

If you would like to view our adoptable pets, click the links below:

Pet Surrender: 

Anyone considering surrendering pets should delay doing so, if possible. If this is not possible, please contact our Pet Retention Counselor at 828-761-2001 x316 for information and resources. 

Lost a Pet:

If you lost a pet, please continue to check our website here, as it is updated continuously with stray animal intakes. You can also call the Buncombe County Animal Shelter at 828-250-6430 to report your lost pet so that our staff can contact you if they come into our shelter. If your pet is microchipped, call the microchip company to report that your animal is lost and to ensure that your contact information is up to date. Finally, we recommend utilizing community based social media groups and pawboost.com. If you find your lost pet on our website, please contact the Buncombe County Animal Shelter so a staff member can help reunite you with your pet.  

Found a Stray:

If you found a stray animal, you can call the Buncombe County Animal Shelter at 828-250-6430 to report the found animal, so that should someone report their animal missing, we can facilitate their reunion. You can also utilize community based social media groups as well as pawboost.com. If you are able to provide temporary care for the animal, we ask that you please do so. If you are not able to care for the stray animal, please contact Animal Services for more information. 

Foster Program:

With the Adoption Center temporarily closing, Fostering will be an important "relief valve." We are going to continue to seek out foster homes as new animals enter the shelter. We encourage those interested in becoming an Emergency Foster fill out the Emergency Foster Application. Anyone interested in fostering in general should complete the traditional application. Our Foster Manager will remain an important resource to all active fosters and if specific assistance is needed, all fosters are encouraged to reach out using the appropriate contact information provided in their foster agreement. 

Volunteer Program:

All volunteers must stop reporting for their duties. With this new restriction, Hiking Hounds and Urban Tails Group Hikes will also not be able to continue until at least April 9.

AHS Thrift Store:

Thrift Store operations have paused and we will not be accepting donations or open to the public until after the Stay Home, Stay Safe order has been lifted.

Community Solutions - Pet Resources and Assistance:

All scheduled Affordable Pet Care Clinics, Behavior Days, Vaccine Clinics and other outreach events are cancelled. Other resources and services may still be available for Buncombe County residents experiencing financial hardship or other crisis. For more information or to request resources or assistance for your pet, please call the Safety Net Helpline at (828)-761-2008.

Animal Emergencies:

For emergencies, please contact Animal Services. 

  • City of Asheville 
    • To report animal abuse, neglect or cruelty in the City of Asheville, please call Animal Services at (828) 252-1110
  • Buncombe County
    • To report abuse, neglect or animal cruelty in Buncombe County, please call the Sheriff’s Office of Animal Services at (828) 250-6670.