Previous month:
December 2020
Next month:
February 2021

January 2021

Asheville Humane Hiking Hounds - Jan. 31

Screen Shot 2021-01-03 at 2.45.08 PMHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The last hike in January will be on Sunday, Jan. 31 at 9 AM.

Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com. Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first serve basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. If you don’t get an email from Hiking Hounds, assume they didn’t get yours! Please be sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

Start time is 9 AM. Hikes are typically 3-5 miles at a brisk pace with elevation changes and provide vigorous exercise for our volunteer hikers as well. They do not cancel hikes because of rain, as our pups don’t mind getting wet. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM.

Hiking Hounds now operates under these Covid-19 protocols:

We will ask that no one sign up for our hikes if they are at risk or have compromised immune systems. If you sign up and begin to feel ill, we ask that you cancel immediately.

We are asking all volunteers to stay in the parking lot, and not come into the building. The hike leaders will sign in the volunteers and will bring the dogs out to them. AHS is asking that ONLY hike leaders enter the building, no volunteers; anyone in the building must wear a mask. You will not be allowed to use the restroom inside the building, so plan on using the port-a-john at the Arboretum, or the woods. 

Bring hand sanitizer if you have it.

Please bring a leash of your own (if you have one), the fewer objects changing hands the better. 

We will maintain a 6 ft bubble as usual, for the safety of our volunteers and the dog's safety and comfort.  

We will eliminate bandanas and cards about the dogs; we can promote them through social media.

We will have one hiker go ahead of our caravan with all the Arboretum passes. That hiker will alert the security personal at the gate & will swipe ALL the passes so each hiker does not have to handle them. 

 When we return to the shelter, all volunteers will again stay outdoors and the hike leaders will come get your dog. This is our normal procedure as our dogs always need social distancing.  

All equipment that we use will be sanitized between hikes. 

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Winter Safety for Your Dog

This information is being provided as a public service from the Watauga Humane Society:

Dog-1144641_1920Exposure to winter’s dry, cold air and chilly rain, sleet and snow can cause chapped paws and itchy, flaking skin, but these aren’t the only discomforts pets can suffer. Winter walks can become downright dangerous if chemicals from ice-melting agents are licked off of bare paws. To help prevent cold weather dangers from affecting your pet’s health, please heed the following advice from our experts:

  • Repeatedly coming out of the cold into the dry heat of your home can cause itchy, flaking skin. Keep your home humidified and towel dry your pet as soon as he comes inside, paying special attention to his feet and in-between the toes. Remove any snow balls from between his foot pads.
  • Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter, as a longer coat will provide more warmth. If your dog is long-haired, simply trim him to minimize the clinging ice balls, salt crystals and de-icing chemicals that can dry his skin, and don’t neglect the hair between his toes. If your dog is short-haired, consider getting him a coat or sweater with a high collar or turtleneck with coverage from the base of the tail to the belly. For many dogs, this is regulation winter wear.
  • Bring a towel on long walks to clean off stinging, irritated paws. After each walk, wash and dry your pet’s feet and stomach to remove ice, salt and chemicals—and check for cracks in paw pads or redness between the toes.
  • Bathe your pets as little as possible during cold spells. Washing too often can remove essential oils and increase the chance of developing dry, flaky skin. If your pooch must be bathed, ask your vet to recommend a moisturizing shampoo and/or rinse.
  • Massaging petroleum jelly or other paw protectants into paw pads before going outside can help protect from salt and chemical agents. Booties provide even more coverage and can also prevent sand and salt from getting lodged between bare toes and causing irritation. Use pet-friendly ice melts whenever possible.
  • Like coolant, antifreeze is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle, and consider using products that contain propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol.
  • Pets burn extra energy by trying to stay warm in wintertime. Feeding your pet a little bit more during the cold weather months can provide much-needed calories, and making sure she has plenty of water to drink will help keep her well-hydrated and her skin less dry.
  • Make sure your companion animal has a warm place to sleep, off the floor and away from all drafts. A cozy dog or cat bed with a warm blanket or pillow is perfect.
  • Remember, if it’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your pet, so keep your animals inside. If left outdoors, pets can freeze, become disoriented, lost, stolen, injured or killed. In addition, don’t leave pets alone in a car during cold weather, as cars can act as refrigerators that hold in the cold and cause animals to freeze to death.
  • Check your car! During the cold winter months, cats can climb into the wheel wells of cars to keep warm. Check your car before you start it by banging loudly on the hood or honking your horn. This gives any snoozing cats a chance to run away before you start driving.

Image by Pezibear from Pixabay


How Cashiers Highlands Humane Society Can Help You

Screen Shot 2021-01-11 at 4.00.14 PM
If you live in the Cashiers/Highlands area, the local humane society can assist you during this pandemic. Here's how:

Our no-kill shelter remains open to the public but in consideration of the guidelines issued by national, state and local authorities, for (what we hope is a brief and yet) the foreseeable future, visits to our shelter will be by appointment only. This will allow us to serve you under the safest possible conditions. For adoptions, donations, and other community outreach programs (see below), we respectfully ask that appointments be made Tuesday-Saturday between 10am-4pm. Please call us at (828)743-5752 to make an appointment.

THE $30 FIX

As we have done for more than 4,000 pets in the past 6 years, CHHS will continue to provide low-cost spay/neuter for your pets for just $30. If that is a hardship, we will fix your pets for free. That's right. For free.

CHHS "MEALS FROM MONTY" PET PANTRY

If you are facing financial hardship and cannot afford to buy pet food, as long as donations continue (please see below) we can provide some food for your pet free of charge. We ask that your pet be spayed/neutered, and if not, we can fix your pet for free. After all, if feeding one animal is a hardship, think of how much it will cost to feed a litter of puppies or kittens!

RABIES VACCINATIONS

There are only 350 Certified Rabies Vaccinators (CRV's) in the state of North Carolina. We have 2 CRV's on staff. Only veterinarians and CRV's can give your pet a rabies vaccination and certificate required by North Carolina law. We always provide rabies vaccinations for just $10. But for now and until we get past this crisis, we will vaccinate your pet to protect against rabies for free. Yes, free.

For more information visit: https://chhumanesociety.org/


Free Pet Food in Henderson County

Screen Shot 2021-01-13 at 9.48.54 AM
Blue Ridge Humane Society is offering an expanded free pet food giveaway schedule this year.  
 
Giveaways will be held on the second Monday of the month at the Adoption Center (88 Centipede Lane, Hendersonville), fourth Saturday at the Boys & Girls Club of Henderson County, and fourth Tuesday at the Interfaith Assistance Ministry.
 
Remaining January Giveaways:
 
Cat and dog food will be distributed first come, first serve, as supplies last to those in need or affected by COVID-19. Social distancing and protective measures will be taken by all staff and we ask the public to do the same during the drive-thru pick-up. Masks are required to be worn during pick-up. Additional resources and supplies will also be available first come, first serve.
 
If a pet owner is in need of food but unable to attend the pick-up, please call or text the BRHS helpline at 828-393-5832.

Asheville Humane Hiking Hounds - Jan. 24, 31

Screen Shot 2021-01-03 at 2.45.08 PMHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

Hikes will be on Sunday at 9 AM (Jan. 24 and 31).

Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com. Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first serve basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. If you don’t get an email from Hiking Hounds, assume they didn’t get yours! Please be sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

Start time is 9 AM. Hikes are typically 3-5 miles at a brisk pace with elevation changes and provide vigorous exercise for our volunteer hikers as well. They do not cancel hikes because of rain, as our pups don’t mind getting wet. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM.

Hiking Hounds now operates under these Covid-19 protocols:

We will ask that no one sign up for our hikes if they are at risk or have compromised immune systems. If you sign up and begin to feel ill, we ask that you cancel immediately.

We are asking all volunteers to stay in the parking lot, and not come into the building. The hike leaders will sign in the volunteers and will bring the dogs out to them. AHS is asking that ONLY hike leaders enter the building, no volunteers; anyone in the building must wear a mask. You will not be allowed to use the restroom inside the building, so plan on using the port-a-john at the Arboretum, or the woods. 

Bring hand sanitizer if you have it.

Please bring a leash of your own (if you have one), the fewer objects changing hands the better. 

We will maintain a 6 ft bubble as usual, for the safety of our volunteers and the dog's safety and comfort.  

We will eliminate bandanas and cards about the dogs; we can promote them through social media.

We will have one hiker go ahead of our caravan with all the Arboretum passes. That hiker will alert the security personal at the gate & will swipe ALL the passes so each hiker does not have to handle them. 

 When we return to the shelter, all volunteers will again stay outdoors and the hike leaders will come get your dog. This is our normal procedure as our dogs always need social distancing.  

All equipment that we use will be sanitized between hikes. 

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Beware of Online Puppy Scams

Carolina Mountain Dog is reprinting this important information from the ASPCA:

Rottweiler-1785760_1920Many families who spent much of the year in their homes due to the COVID-19 pandemic turned to the Internet to look for a pet. Unfortunately, more people looking for pets online means more people looking to profit. In 2020, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) has reported a record-high number of scams related to online puppy purchases. 

According to the BBB, the number of pet scams reported in 2020 will be more than double the number reported last year, and five times higher than in 2017 with families reporting that they paid for dogs they never received—and maybe never existed. These scams resulted in families losing over $3 million.  

But falling for a scam isn’t the only risk to buying a puppy online. Puppy purchasers have also reported receiving different puppies from the ones they “ordered,” sick puppies or a seller that disappears once the dog is shipped. 

And even if your mail-ordered pup is as cute and healthy as you hoped, there are real risks you may not have considered to buying a dog over the Internet—ones that harm dogs. Online, every seller markets themselves as a responsible, caring breeder of high-quality pups but the thousands of dollars sent to a far-away seller may actually be helping keep a puppy mill in business.

Cruel breeders use deceptive photos and slick websites to fool families. They exploit weak laws that allow them to keep dogs in conditions no one who loves dogs would accept. They use their profits not to provide better care for dogs, but to breed and sell more puppies.  

No animal lover wants to support cruelty. If you’re looking to add a dog to your family, please consider adoption and work with a reputable local shelter or rescue, or visit a responsible breeder

Source: https://www.aspca.org/news/when-it-comes-online-puppies-what-you-see-not-what-you-get

Image by kim_hester from Pixabay


Asheville Humane Hiking Hounds - Jan. 17, 24, 31

Screen Shot 2021-01-03 at 2.45.08 PMHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

Hikes in January will be every Sunday at 9 AM (Jan. 17, 24 and 31).

Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com. Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first serve basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. If you don’t get an email from Hiking Hounds, assume they didn’t get yours! Please be sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

Start time is 9 AM. Hikes are typically 3-5 miles at a brisk pace with elevation changes and provide vigorous exercise for our volunteer hikers as well. They do not cancel hikes because of rain, as our pups don’t mind getting wet. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM.

Hiking Hounds now operates under these Covid-19 protocols:

We will ask that no one sign up for our hikes if they are at risk or have compromised immune systems. If you sign up and begin to feel ill, we ask that you cancel immediately.

We are asking all volunteers to stay in the parking lot, and not come into the building. The hike leaders will sign in the volunteers and will bring the dogs out to them. AHS is asking that ONLY hike leaders enter the building, no volunteers; anyone in the building must wear a mask. You will not be allowed to use the restroom inside the building, so plan on using the port-a-john at the Arboretum, or the woods. 

Bring hand sanitizer if you have it.

Please bring a leash of your own (if you have one), the fewer objects changing hands the better. 

We will maintain a 6 ft bubble as usual, for the safety of our volunteers and the dog's safety and comfort.  

We will eliminate bandanas and cards about the dogs; we can promote them through social media.

We will have one hiker go ahead of our caravan with all the Arboretum passes. That hiker will alert the security personal at the gate & will swipe ALL the passes so each hiker does not have to handle them. 

 When we return to the shelter, all volunteers will again stay outdoors and the hike leaders will come get your dog. This is our normal procedure as our dogs always need social distancing.  

All equipment that we use will be sanitized between hikes. 

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


ReTail Scene: January Sale for Handicapped Pets

Screen Shot 2021-01-11 at 11.33.20 AM
Walkin' Pets specializes in equipment for handicapped dogs. During their January sale, you'll find special prices on the Walkin' Scooter, Walkin' Ski Attachment, Walkin' Dog Boots, Walkin' Splint, Walkin' Wheels Rear Wheelchair and more.

If your pet is handicapped, elderly or has any trouble walking, you'll find the right stuff for him or her at Walkin' Pets -- on sale in January. Check out the sale here: https://www.handicappedpets.com/on-sale/


The Danger of Xylitol for Your Dog

CautionEver feed your dog peanut butter? Did you check the label first? It may shock you to learn that some peanut butters contain a sugar substitute called xylitol. According to veterinarian Dr. Stephanie Silberstang, writing for PetPlace, "Although xylitol is safe for human consumption... it can be fatal when ingested by dogs. ...although dogs can tolerate regular sugar, xylitol is absorbed rapidly and can cause a spike in insulin. Because xylitol is not sugar, a spike in insulin causes severe hypoglycemia that can result in weakness, collapse, and seizures."

Xylitol is also commonly found in such ordinary items as mints, toothpaste, dietary supplements, gum and even baked goods. It's important to read the ingredients on any product label before giving your dog any food intended for humans. If one of those ingredients is xylitol, keep it away from your dog.

For more information about xylitol's dangers and how to treat xylitol toxicity, read Silberstang's article here: https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-health/xylitol-toxicity-dogs/?


Asheville Humane Hiking Hounds - Every Sunday in January

Screen Shot 2021-01-03 at 2.45.08 PMHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

Hikes in January will be every Sunday at 9 AM (Jan. 10, 17, 24 and 31).

Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com. Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first serve basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. If you don’t get an email from Hiking Hounds, assume they didn’t get yours! Please be sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

Start time is 9 AM. Hikes are typically 3-5 miles at a brisk pace with elevation changes and provide vigorous exercise for our volunteer hikers as well. They do not cancel hikes because of rain, as our pups don’t mind getting wet. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM.

Hiking Hounds now operates under these Covid-19 protocols:

We will ask that no one sign up for our hikes if they are at risk or have compromised immune systems. If you sign up and begin to feel ill, we ask that you cancel immediately.

We are asking all volunteers to stay in the parking lot, and not come into the building. The hike leaders will sign in the volunteers and will bring the dogs out to them. AHS is asking that ONLY hike leaders enter the building, no volunteers; anyone in the building must wear a mask. You will not be allowed to use the restroom inside the building, so plan on using the port-a-john at the Arboretum, or the woods. 

Bring hand sanitizer if you have it.

Please bring a leash of your own (if you have one), the fewer objects changing hands the better. 

We will maintain a 6 ft bubble as usual, for the safety of our volunteers and the dog's safety and comfort.  

We will eliminate bandanas and cards about the dogs; we can promote them through social media.

We will have one hiker go ahead of our caravan with all the Arboretum passes. That hiker will alert the security personal at the gate & will swipe ALL the passes so each hiker does not have to handle them. 

 When we return to the shelter, all volunteers will again stay outdoors and the hike leaders will come get your dog. This is our normal procedure as our dogs always need social distancing.  

All equipment that we use will be sanitized between hikes. 

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Shelter Dog in the White House

Screen Shot 2020-11-17 at 12.54.47 PMRegardless of your political persuasion, as a dog lover you will likely be happy to learn that, after President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated on January 20, two German shepherds, Champ, 12 and Major, 2, will occupy the White House. According to MarketWatch, Major, "whom the Bidens adopted from the Delaware Humane Association in 2018 after fostering him for several months, will be the first rescue dog from an animal shelter to live in the White House."

The ASPCA is all for it. Matt Bershadker, ASPCA CEO and president, says, "We're thrilled the Bidens' dog Major will be the first shelter dog ever to call the White House his home. This is a wonderful opportunity for people to see how fostering and adopting animals saves lives, helps animal shelters, and brings love and joy to families."

Obviously rescue pets have taken the nation by the storm, especially during the pandemic -- they were named TIME magazine's "2020 Pet of the Year"!

Image: Stephanie Gomez/Delaware Humane Association, via Associated Press

 


How to "Quarantrain" Your Dog

Dog-2871914_1920Many dog owners are starting the new year where they left off in 2020 -- by staying close to home because of the pandemic. This reality can be actually be very positive for you and your dog. In fact, you can use the time to do some "quarantraining." According to certified trainer Kathy Callahan writing in Whole Dog Journal, the pandemic gives dog owners "a chance to use our household routines to prompt a handful of simple one-minute sessions throughout the day."

Callahan offers some specific tips for exactly how to use these short daily sessions to train your dog while you are spending more of your time at home. The "sit" command is a good example. Writes Callahan, "It’s the one thing that all owners work into their daily routine. Every single time they feed the dog, they ask for a sit first. Dog does behavior A; dog gets reward B. Reinforcement each time, 365 days a year. That makes for a rock-solid behavior." Callahan says you can apply this same basic principle to training your dog to follow other commands.

"Quarantraining" is an idea worth trying. Read Callahan's interesting article here:
https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/training/quarantrain-your-dog-how-to-train-your-dog-while-staying-home/ 

Image by Sarah Richter from Pixabay