Dog Health

Coronavirus and Other Dogs

From WoofReport.com:

Dog-2273980_1280Petting Petiquette. 

With social distancing to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, you need to stay at least 6 feet away from others, but does the same apply for dogs? The Washington Post reporter Karin Brulliard answers the burning question: Can I still pet other people’s dogs? 

According to experts at the American Veterinary Medical Association, “based on available evidence, there’s little reason to avoid petting” because the virus survives best on smooth surfaces and not “porous materials, such as pet fur." Other experts cited advise “the most conservative approach would be to refrain from touching others’ dogs” since the dog owner may be infected but show no symptoms. (The Washington Post)

Image: Pixabay.com


Pet Safety Tips You May Not Have Thought About

Dog-portrait-1717848_1920Most dog lovers consider their pets part of the family. This is great -- until we realize that dogs, like humans, are exposed to real dangers from ordinary things in and around our own home. Of greater concern is that some of the things we as humans take for granted can present serious hazards to dogs.

Did you ever think about the fact, for example, that common household items such as string, rubber bands, electrical wire and the cords from your blinds or window shades could be dangerous to your dog? Have you made sure to secure household cleaners, insecticides, plant fertilizer and antifreeze so your dog doesn't get into them? Did you know some household plants can be toxic to dogs, and that some common drugs can be harmful to drugs?

A site called HomeGuides offers some valuable free advice about "Keeping Pets Safe in the Home," covering the above, as well as providing a room-by-room safety guide, Check it out here: https://homeguides.co.uk/pet-safety/

Image: Pixabay.com


Quality Pet Food Delivered to Your Door

Screen Shot 2020-02-09 at 3.25.18 PMPet Wants is a new mobile pet food delivery service in the Asheville area. Part of a national franchise, the objective of Pet Wants is to deliver fresh, high quality food directly to the customer's door. According to Pet Wants, "Most commercial pet food is manufactured in mass quantities and sent to a series of distribution warehouses before finally making it onto the shelf at your local store. There it sits…possibly for up to 6-8 months before it’s purchased for consumption. Because pet food loses its nutritional value over time, pets can ultimately end up eating a diet that’s low in nutrition and can ultimately lead to unnecessary sickness, disease and even a shortened life.

"Freshness is the key to good nutrition. We provide our proprietary pet food formula that has been carefully developed over the years and deliver to your home to ensure freshness. Your pets will appreciate a healthy, complete and balanced pet food made from fresh, all-natural ingredients. Since our food is slow-cooked to lock in nutrients and is made in frequent, small batches, we deliver the fresh and highly nutritional food to our customers within weeks, not months, of being made. Our customers appreciate the convenience of our auto-delivery system that they can modify prior to each delivery. This ensures that the best possible food is delivered when they need and only how much they need – delivered right to their door – for the same price as most premium commercial pet foods."

The local owner of Pet Wants, Christian Ray, is a Brevard College graduate and founded the Blue Ridge Flyball Club. Pet Wants makes free, personal delivery of quality pet food to Buncombe County households. For more information, visit: https://www.petwants.com/Asheville/


The H.E.A.R.T. of Cashiers-Highlands

Screen Shot 2019-11-13 at 1.25.58 PM
The H.E.A.R.T. of North Carolina (Humane/Emergency/Adoption/Rescue/Transport) is a service of the Cashiers-Highlands Humane Society.

The 27-animal capacity mobile medical/rescue vehicle allows the humane society to provide low-cost spay/neuter surgeries and vaccination clinics, increase adoptions at off-site events, rescue animals from puppy mills and hoarding cases, and assist first responders with transport and safe refuge for animals in times of natural disasters. With the H.E.A.R.T. of North Carolina, Cashiers-Highlands Humane Society has been designated as an official Emergency Placement Partner by the Humane Society of the United States.

For more information about H.E.A.R.T. services, visit https://www.chhumanesociety.org/heart-of-nc


Dogs and Sleep

Screen Shot 2020-01-08 at 10.16.53 AM"Let sleeping dogs lie" is a familiar proverb that actually means not interfering in a situation because you could make it worse. However, in the context of "dogs and sleep," it seems to be just as appropriate. Dogs sleep a lot -- on average as much as fourteen hours per day, according to sleep experts at Tuck -- so it pays to just, well, let them lie.

Tuck discusses other fascinating facts about dogs and sleep in a helpful article that includes information about dog vs. human sleep cycles, dog sleeping positions and things you can do to help your dog get better sleep.

The article on sleep is just one in a series of "pet sleep resources" provided by Tuck. You'll find them here: https://www.tuck.com/pet-sleep-resources/


Be Part of the Dog Aging Project

Screen Shot 2019-11-15 at 3.42.25 PMInterested in learning how genes, lifestyle and environment influence a dog's aging? Then you might like to participate in the Dog Aging Project, a nationally-funded research project run by the University of Washington and Texas A&M University.

The Dog Aging Project brings together a community of people committed to giving dogs the happiest, longest lives possible. Expert veterinarians and scientists will team up with 10,000 dogs and their owners to identify factors critical to improving healthy lifespan.

Dogs and their owners are the heart of the Dog Aging Project. If you nominate your dog, you’ll have the opportunity to partner with the research team as a citizen scientist. They’ll ask you to fill out surveys about your dog’s health and life experience. They’ll provide you with a kit to sample your dog’s saliva for genetic testing. They may ask you to complete special activities with your dog and report back on their performance. The goal is to make the experience easy and fun for you and your dog. The researchers hope you’ll join their team as they work together to accelerate medical breakthroughs for dogs and humans.

For more information about this unique project, visit: https://dogagingproject.org/


Nationally Acclaimed Spay/Neuter Clinic in Asheville

SpayneuterDid you know the ASPCA Spay/Neuter Alliance, a nationally acclaimed spay/neuter clinic, is in Asheville? This is one of the best places in the Carolina mountains to inexpensively spay or neuter your pet.

ASPCA Spay/Neuter Alliance offers high-quality, low-cost spay/neuter services to the communities of Western North Carolina at their state-of-the-art stationary clinic in Asheville, North Carolina. A transport service is available through partnerships with local shelters and rescue organizations in 18 surrounding counties.

For more information or to book an appointment, call (828) 252-2079 or to book an appointment online, visit:
https://www.aspca.org/animal-protection/spayneuter-services/aspca-spay-neuter-alliance#tab-1

Surgical Fees

There is no additional cost for pregnant, in-heat, or cryptorchid animals, or community cat ear tips.

Female dog $65
Male dog $65
Female cat $50
Male cat $35
Microchip $15
Umbilical hernia repair $15
Nail trim $5

Cash, credit cards, or checks accepted. Financial assistance may be available. Please call for details.

Vaccine Fees

Administered only with surgery.

Required Vaccines

Rabies (if not up-to-date) $15

Optional Canine Vaccines

DA2LPPv (distemper/parvo) $15
Bordetella (kennel cough) $15

Optional Feline Vaccines

FVRCP (distemper/upper respiratory) $15

 


Need Veterinary Care in Madison County?

Screen Shot 2019-11-05 at 11.21.42 AMFriends of Madison County Animals (FOMCA) has arranged for a veterinary clinic on alternate Fridays at the FOMCA office, 115 Blannahasset Island Road, Marshall, NC 28753. Services are provided by Dr. Suzanne of French Broad Mobile Vet. You can make an appointment by calling (828) 412-1181, but walk-ins are welcome.

The veterinary clinic schedule for the rest of November and December is on Fridays from 2 to 5 PM on Nov. 29 and Dec. 13 and 27.


How to be an Environmentally Responsible Dog Owner

Dog-2228595_1920Guest Post by Angie Hill

Are you looking for environmentally friendly ideas that you can use as a pet-loving dog owner? Whether you realize it or not, the choices you make as a dog owner have the potential to impact our environment. Dogs are still animals by nature and this means striking the right balance between being eco-friendly and serving the best interests of your four-legged friend. This post will help you learn how you can do your own good work for the environment while also giving your dog a happy, healthy life.

Walk More

Taking your dog for walks is a sure-fire way to keep him or her happy, healthy and content.

You can also use walking with your dog as a great excuse to skip driving to a store or to a friend’s house. Fewer carbon emissions mean you are doing something good for the environment, your own health and your dog’s too, so reach for the leash and take more walks!

Switch to Sustainable Pet Food

According to the American Pet Products Association, $30.32 billion was spent on pet food in 2018 in the U.S. The food you feed your dog should be balanced but protein-heavy. Regular dog food you buy will contain 20-40% protein. A lot of this protein comes from animal sources and just like humans who live on a meat-based diet, there’s a big ecological footprint left as a result.

You don’t have to turn your dog vegan, but if you want to be eco-friendlier you have two other options:

  •     Buy sustainable pet food
  •     Make your own

If you want to make your own food at home, here are some simple recipes to use: https://themotherhuddle.com/making-your-own-dog-food/

Two valuable dog food tips that can help to reduce your environmental impact are:

Less Processed: Typically, if food has gone through more processing, it has taken more energy to produce. Therefore, try to feed dogs food that is less processed.

Dry & Wet Food: It might not even have crossed your mind, but wet food is heavier due to having more water content - this means that there are higher emissions when wet food is transported, so dry food is better for the environment in this instance.

Your pet’s health comes first and you should consider this before you switch their diets. When deciding on what food to buy, consult your veterinarian before making a big change in your pet’s diet.

Choose Toys Wisely

A large number of toys on the market are made from plastic, and it can be hard to move away from them when you’re on the hunt for a new one for your dog. If you have a pet that is full of life and gets through toys, you will end up tossing them away all the time. Try to choose toys made from recyclable materials or natural fibers as this will have a positive effect, environmentally. You could also try one of these homemade brain games .

Buy Non-Toxic Shampoo

If your dog runs a mile at the mere mention of a bath you aren’t alone! But baths are a necessity, so when it comes to bath time, switch to using a natural, organic dog shampoo. Ensure it is non-toxic and is free from parabens and dyes, too, as this is better for the environment (no excess chemicals end up going down the drain and into the environment) and your dog’s coat and skin.

Your vet will be able to help you make the right choice of shampoo; many companies advertise their products as “all-natural” but they aren’t!

Use Biodegradable Waste Bags

Those little poop bags that often get used to pick up and dispose of a dog’s waste are part of the global plastic epidemic.  They require hundreds of years for them to biodegrade. Avoid this issue by opting to use only compostable bags which take three to six months to fully decompose.

Angie Hill Angie is a dog-loving, outdoor enthusiast who writes for WoofDog.org, a site that offers dog-centered health, food and behavior advice.

Image: Pixabay.com


Walk-in Vaccine Clinic, Greenville, SC

Praisaeng-freedigGreenville Humane Society offers a low-cost, walk-in vaccine clinic open to the public. The Medical Center is located at 307 Airport Road, Greenville, SC, to the left of the Adoption Center.

Hours are:

  • Monday - Friday, 9 AM - 4 PM
  • 1st Saturday of each month, 9 AM - 12 PM
  • 2nd Thursday of each month, 5:30 - 7 PM

This is a walk-in only clinic; no appointments are necessary. The following services are provided:

Service Price
1-Year Rabies Vaccine $9
3-Year Rabies Vaccine $25
1-Year Canine/Puppy Distemper/Parvo-DHPP $9
3-Year Canine Distemper/Parvo-DHPP $25
Canine Kennel Cough-Bordetella $15
Leptospirosis $15
H3N8/H3N2 Flu Vaccine $15
Heartworm Antigen Test (dogs) $25
Feline Distemper Vaccine $9
3-Year Feline Distemper Vaccine $25
Feline Leukemia (FeLV) Vaccine $15
Feline Leukemia/FIV Combo Test $26
Microchipping $20 + tax

Please note – All dogs must be leashed and all cats must be in carriers. Leashes, collars and carriers are available for purchase should you need to buy them.

For the safety of the staff, customers and animals we do not allow children in the exam rooms.

Image: Praisaeng, Freedigitalphotos.net


Low Cost Vaccines - Asheville, Oct. 27

AHS Low Cost Vaccinations
A low-cost vaccine and microchip clinic will be held on Sunday, October 27 from 11 am to 2 pm at Asheville Humane Society, 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville, NC 28801.

This event is for both dogs and cats! No appointment is needed, but please be prepared to wait in line. Availability of vaccines may vary. **CASH ONLY FOR PAYMENT**

If you aren't able to make this event please see details about other community clinics here: https://ashevillehumane.org/resources/low-cost-vaccine-clinics

COST:

Rabies 1 year | (Dogs or cats over 3 months) | $10.00

Rabies 3 year | (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate to prove current on rabies) | $10.00

Bordetella - Kennel cough | (Dogs over 2 months) | $15.00

DA2PPV - | (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs) | $15.00

DA2PPV + Lepto - | (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs) | $15.00

FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia | (Cats over 2 months) | $20.00

FVRCP | (Cats over 2 months) | $15.00

FELV | (Cats over 2 months) | $15.00

Microchip | (Dogs or cats over 2 months) | $15.00

**Cash is only accepted form of payment**


How to Improve a Disabled Dog's Quality of Life

Guest Post by Lori Wade

German-shepherd-1077442_1920We all love our dogs, which is what makes it absolutely heartbreaking to see them struggle. There are few things more inherently awful than being forced to see any living creature struggle with pain or disability. That’s especially true for dogs, both because they are so loyal and lovable as well as the fact that they’re so innocent and helpless when it comes to maladies.

Dogs are absolutely heartwarming creatures, and their maladies are thus all the more heartbreaking. You never want that to be the fate of your dog. You want to make sure that they remain in good health and good spirits – even if they are disabled. Thankfully, these tips can help you do just that.

Dog Wheelchairs

From accidents and injuries to the ravages of old age, there are many reasons why your dog may be having trouble walking with comfort – if they can walk at all. If your dog finds themselves in this position or otherwise suffers from mobility issues, it might well be time to look into a dog wheelchair.

Dog wheelchairs are typically easily fitted around the dog’s waist and backside. They enable dogs to wheel themselves around in the event of bad hips or one or more legs not being up to walking. These wheelchairs feature openings at the bottom and back, allowing dogs to “do their business” unimpeded while wearing them.

Dog Ramps

If your dog has a broken leg, hip dysplasia, or any number of other conditions that hurt their hips or legs, it can be incredibly difficult and painful for them to get upstairs. You don’t want that to be a problem, of course. While you can sometimes carry smaller dogs, this can get old fast, won’t always be convenient for either party and isn’t exactly an easy option with larger dogs.

That’s why you’ll want to look into installing a dog ramp instead. As with ramps for human wheelchair users, they enable dogs in wheelchairs to get up to an area that would otherwise be inaccessible to them. They also make it possible to avoid steps.

Ramps can be especially helpful for your outdoor area near the front and backyards. Your dogs may not be able to get up porch steps with ease, so these dog ramps can be essential to get to and from the doors in question as they go into and out of your home.

Addressing Dog Vision Problems

As your dog gets older, it’s possible that they may begin to suffer from vision problems. That’s why you’ll want to make sure that you keep the light on for them, ensuring that areas in which they are staying are bright. You’ll also want to be sure to ask your veterinarian about any potential treatment if these eyesight problems worsen.

Dog Medications

Ask your veterinarian before giving your dog any new medication. There are some medicines on the market, such as phenobarbital, which can treat the same issues in dogs (seizures) as they do in humans. In other cases, there are medicines that are more dog-specific, such as proin, which helps tighten the muscles around a dog’s urinary tract in the case of urinary incontinence.

Whatever the case, you’ll want to be sure that your dog is getting the right medication for them. Some dogs can have allergic reactions to some medicines, some do better with some options than others, and then, of course, you always need to be on the lookout for bad dog medicines which may be harmful. Your vet can be instrumental in determining all of this.

Ensure your dog gets the care they need when they need it most by accommodating their disability - and if you have a furry friend who is advancing in age, make the most of your dog’s golden years.

 Lori Wade is a journalist from Louisville. A content writer who has experience in small editions, Lori is now engaged in news and conceptual articles on the topic of pet care and veterinary. You can find her on  Twitter & LinkedIn or on other social media, where you can read Lori’s useful insights!

Image: Pixabay.com


Walk Your Dog Every Day This Week!

Man-3687274_1920Okay, so as a responsible dog owner, you know you need to walk your dog every day anyway... but please make a special effort to do it this week.

Why? Because this is "National Walk Your Dog Week" (October 1 - 7), celebrated the first week of October since 2010. Here's some information about why it was founded from the week's Facebook page:

"The growing problem of human and canine obesity in America, coupled with the overpopulation of dogs in shelters, has much to do with a lack of exercise. National Walk Your Dog Week is a way to highlight these issues and encourage people to get out with their dog and start getting healthy!

Many dogs in the shelter are there because of destruction issues. Most of these issues relate directly to a lack of exercise. Pent up in a run or crate all day, will only exacerbate your dog's destructive tendencies. Give your dog the exercise that he or she needs - and you'll find that a tired dog...is a good dog!

Autumn is a great time to get out and start walking. You can enjoy the leaves changing color, the crispness in the air and it gives you time to reflect on the year and helps you to make new changes for the coming year...healthy ones!

With the holidays upon you, you can start to create a healthy way to avoid the dreaded weight gain that often comes from too many holiday goodies because you have set a new habit in motion. If you and/or your dog are overweight, walk just 30 minutes a day, three times a week, and you can reduce your weight by 5% and your dog's by 15%. So think about how healthy you and your best friend will be if you walked 5 times a week - or every day! After a solid week of walking, you'll feel so good as you raise the levels of endorphins in your brain, which combats depression and anxiety and you'll notice a change in your dog's behavior as well. If you walk 2-3 times a day for 20-30 minutes each time....you and your dog will feel phenomenal!! If you can run your dog....you'll notice a faster change in his or her behavior."

Image: Pixabay.com


Should You Run with Your Dog?

Leisure-1551705_1920You've seen them -- or maybe you're one of them...those folks who are always running with their dogs. It seems to be the best of both worlds, because both the runner and the dog are outdoors in the fresh air, getting lots of healthy exercise. So, should you run with your dog? The answer very much depends on the dog.

There's a helpful article on this topic by Nicci Micco in the Fall 2019 issue of Subaru's Drive magazine. According to Micco, it isn't a good idea to run with puppies before the age of one since their joints can't handle the impact. Also, certain types of dogs are made for running while others simply are not. For example, short-haired, long-legged dogs such as Weimaraners handle running just fine. However, running isn't typically recommended for breeds with known hip issues, such as German shepherds, and dogs with those cute little pushed in faces, such as bulldogs and pugs.

Micco discusses some key tips in her article:

  • Start slow
  • Consider the conditions
  • Get the right gear
  • Protect their paws
  • Be the (reasonable) leader
  • Pay attention to your partner.

The article, sponsored by the dog-loving car company Subaru, is well worth reading. It can be found here: https://subarudrive.com/articles/get-fit-with-fido-fa19

Image: Pixabay.com


Low Cost Rabies and Vaccination Clinic - Spruce Pine, Sep. 21

Praisaeng-freedigA rabies and vaccination clinic for dogs and cats will be held on Saturday, September 21 from 9 AM to 12 PM at Parkway Fire and Rescue, 12966 266S, Spruce Pine, NC 28777.

 

$10 each:
Rabies (1 year only)
Distemper/parvo
Kennel cough

Dewormer: $5

Microchip ID: $25

Metal ID tags available, as well as sign-ups for low cost spay/neuter. Cash and checks are accepted. For more information, call (828) 765-6952.

Image: Praisaeng, freedigitalphotos.net


How to Save Money on Dog Ownership

Purse-3548021_1920Owning a dog can be an expensive investment. Although the payoff is priceless, you always want to be mindful of your pet costs. With vet bills, toys, food, treats, and grooming, pet care costs can add up quickly. Most of those expenses are just annually, which does not cover unexpected expenses that can come with a hefty price tag.

According to the ASPCA, owning a dog can cost anywhere from $700 to $1000 on average per year. If you want to reduce your pet care expenses while not sacrificing the quality of your care, consider these thrifty ideas for saving on pet care.

1. Start Grooming at Home

Grooming your pet at home can save you serious coin. Pet grooming can cost a couple of hundreds of dollars a year. Starting to care for your pet’s fur at home will eliminate most of the costs incurred at the groomers. Not to mention that when grooming your pet, you can get a close look for any fleas, flea dirt, or even ticks.

Invest in a Pet Brush

Brushing your pet’s fur can help keep it in good condition and avoid too much shedding. Giving your pet a good brushing will help remove dirt and spread your pet’s natural oils throughout their coat.

Having well-conditioned hair can help prevent future tangles and can actually help keep your pet’s skin clean.

Bathe at Home

If you have a bathtub, then you can reduce pet costs by bathing your pet at home. Bathing your pet at home can help mitigate any skin problems your pet may have. Some pets require baths more regularly than others, so always check to make sure what is best for your furry friend.

Be sure to use a pet-friendly shampoo that is species or breed specific. This will better cater to the needs of your pet.

2. Pet Food Savings

Annually, pet food can cost anywhere between $50 and $400 depending on the kind of pet you have. That makes food one of the most expensive annual expenses when it comes to pet care costs. Cutting down on food costs can save you a sizable chunk.

Watch for Sales

Keeping an eye out for sales and scanning flyers can alert you to many saving opportunities. You can sign up for food manufacturers’ newsletters, which can often give you special offers and coupons. Buying on sale food can help to significantly reduce pet costs.

Buy In Bulk

Buying in bulk usually pays off, regardless of what you are buying. Usually, retailers and manufacturers offer discount or sales to those who buy in bulk. You can also buy in bulk from warehouses as a significantly reduced price. Some experts suggest that buying at larger warehouse retailers can save you as much as 50% on pet food costs. 

If you choose to buy your dog food online, buying the largest bag and multiple bags of quality pet food can come with a discount and free shipping. If you choose to buy in bulk, just make sure that your pet can eat it all before the expiration date!

Make Your Own Food

Making your own food for your pet can pay off in reducing pet costs. You can start by using ingredients you already have in your kitchen to start to make food or treats for your pet. You can find a number of easy pet food recipes online to get you started as a pet chef. Be sure to research any ingredients to make sure that they are safe for your furry friend.

Making your own pet food can be easy and cost-effective. Simple ingredients like vegetables, rice, and tuna can make up a large part of your pet’s diet at little cost to you. Talk about an easy cost-reducing measure.

Take Part In Rewards Programs

Retailers tend to reward loyal customers. Loyalty or rewards programs can give you a sizable discount on food. Just for signing up for a rewards program, you are often given an initial coupon. Each time you buy, you can receive more rewards. When it comes to reducing pet costs, it pays to be loyal!

3. Avoid Vet Expensive Bills

You should take your pet to the vet at least once a year for an annual check-up. But when it comes to unexpected visits, you want to try your best to prevent those pricey vet visits. A large number of expensive vet bills could be avoided by proactive and preventative care of your pet. Here are some tips on how to potentially avoid costly vet bills.

Brush Your Pet’s Teeth

Brushing your pet’s teeth can be a pain, but it is a necessary pain. If you skip brushing your pet’s teeth, they can develop periodontal disease. This disease can cause a number of complications for your pet’s heart, kidneys, and liver. By brushing your pet’s teeth, you can help to prevent future complications.

Use a toothbrush specifically designed for your pet and do not use human toothpaste as it can be toxic to animals. Give your pet a taste of the toothpaste before you start brushing to ease them into teeth brushing. A healthy and clean bite can help save you money in the long run.

Regularly Exercise Your Pet

Your pet needs regular exercise in order to live a healthy and happy life. By providing your pet with sufficient exercise, you can not only help their energy levels, but you can also help prevent future illnesses. Often, pets that are not regularly exercised struggle with being overweight or obese.

Carrying that extra weight will not only be harder on your pet’s joints, but it can also put them at risk for obesity-related complications. Take care of your pet’s body to help prevent heart and lung issues that can come with being overweight. Exercise your pet regularly as a preventative cost-saving measure.

Other Cost-Saving Measures

Consider giving your pet some treats or food that cover as many bases as you can. You can save a pretty penny by covering all of your bases. You can try giving your dog CBD treats like those from FOMO Bones. These tasty treats come packed with high-quality ingredients and CBD, which has been shown to help treat aching joints and anxiety

This article is originally published on FOMO Bones.

Image: Pixabay.com


Low Cost Vaccines - Sylva, Sep. 7

Praisaeng-freedigThere will be a community vaccine and microchip clinic on Saturday, September 7 from 9 AM to 3 PM at Bridge Park in Sylva, NC. Rabies and other vaccinations will be available for a suggested donation of $10 each. Microchips will be available for a $20 donation. Free dog tags will be made on site by Fish & More Pet Store (donations appreciated).

Image: Praisaeng, freedigitalphotos.net


Madison County - August Spay/Neuter and Vet Clinics

Screen Shot 2019-07-09 at 12.22.51 PM
Friends of Madison County Animals (https://www.fomca.org) makes low-cost spay/neuter and veterinary services available to Madison County residents each month. These are the August dates for FOMCA services:

Low Cost Spay/Neuter

Wed., Aug. 14 and Wed., Aug. 28
6:30 - 8 AM drop off
Call 828-649-9798 or visit https://www.fomca.org for cost and instructions.

French Broad Vet Clinic

Fri., Aug. 9 and Fri., Aug. 23
2 - 5 PM at the FOMCA Office in Marshall
Call 828-412-1181 for more information.
Walk-ins are welcome.


Is CBD Good for Dogs?

Screen Shot 2019-06-15 at 2.03.37 PMAs a dog owner, you likely have your ears to the ground for the latest and greatest ways to treat your dog, from actual treats and food to enrichment toys and doggie daycare. If your dog’s health suffers at all, however, you may be looking for more serious options to improve their quality of life and wellbeing.

One such option is CBD. Short for cannabidiol, CBD is a cannabis compound that provides health benefits without the high of marijuana. Many dog owners are increasingly turning to CBD to treat a variety of canine conditions, from anxiety to arthritis.

CBD is legal in all 50 states and it is becoming widely available in Western North Carolina, but the research around its effects on dogs is still developing. However, a growing number of veterinarians are recommending it to their clients. While the research is not yet definitive, many believe CBD offers several therapeutic benefits to dogs.

The CBD Awareness Project has created a comprehensive guide that will help you evaluate CBD for dogs. You'll find it here: https://www.cbdoil.org/cbd-oil-for-dogs/