Dog Health

Vaccine Clinic - Greenville, SC, Nov. 3

Screen Shot 2018-01-19 at 4.16.20 PMGreenville Humane Society holds a monthly vaccine clinic the first Saturday of the month. In February, the clinic will be held on Saturday, November 3 from 9 AM to 12 PM. All dogs must be leashed and all cats must be in carriers.

No appointment is necessary. Get all of your animal's shots starting at just $9, with no additional fees. All fees go directly back to care for the animals they serve. They also offer heartworm testing, rabies vaccines, ear cleaning, microchipping and much more. Be sure to get your pet's flea/tick/heartworm preventative while you're at the clinic!

Greenville Humane Society's facility is located at 305 Airport Road in Greenville, SC. For more information, including a detailed list of vaccination prices, go to: https://www.greenvillehumane.com/vaccine-clinic/


Halloween and Your Dog

Dog-714861_1920Halloween may be a fun holiday for humans, but it can be pretty scary, and sometimes dangerous, for dogs. Here are some valuable Halloween safety tips from the ASPCA's Animal Poison Control Center:

Lock Candy Away
Kids love to stash candy in their rooms, but a dog’s keen sense of smell will lead him to even the most cleverly hidden treasure. Contact a veterinary professional right away if your pet does get into Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or is sugar-free and contains xylitol.

Ditto the Glow Sticks
Glow sticks are used to help keep kids safe while they are out in the dark. Pets (especially cats) find these glow sticks to be a lot of fun and often puncture them. While most of the sticks are labeled as non-toxic, they do have an extremely bitter taste and pets who bite into them may begin drooling and racing around the house. A little treat or sip of milk will usually stop the taste reaction.

Have Pets Identified and Visible
There are a lot of extra people on the streets at Halloween, and that combined with strange costumes can spook pets and cause them to bolt. If you take your pet out after dark, make sure he or she wears a reflective collar and is securely leashed. And make sure your pet has proper identification on the collar.

Keep Pets Calm
Even pets who are kept indoors may experience intense anxiety over the large number of strangely dressed visitors. Keeping your pet away from trick-or-treaters may do the trick, but if you think more will be needed be sure and speak with your vet well in advance about options to help calm your pet.

Check Those Costumes
Costumes can be fun for the whole family. However, if you are planning on dressing up your best bud, ensure that the costume fits well and isn’t going to slip and tangle the pet or cause a choking hazard if chewed on. And never leave a costumed pet unattended.

 


Low-cost Shot Clinic - Candler, Sept. 29

Praisaeng-freedigOn Saturday, Sept. 29 from  12 - 3pm, there is will be a low-cost rabies and shot clinic with James Boatwright, DVM in Candler, NC. 

This clinic is located at Candler Feed & Seed, 1275 Smokey Park Highway, Candler, NC and will be held the last Saturday of every month. For more information, call 828-553-5792.

Pricing is as follows:

$15 / 1 year rabies

$20 / 3 year rabies  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)

$20 / DHPP combo for dogs

$10 / Lepto

$20 / Bordetella (dogs)

$25 / FVRCP/FELV combo for cats

Image: Praisaeng, freedigitalphotos.net


How to Trim Your Dog's Nails

Guest Post by Josh S.

Paw-548634_1920No matter how active your furry friend might be outdoors, nail trimming is one of the most vital grooming needs of every dog. Although most dogs will wear down their nails naturally,  they need a little help from you sometimes.

Every dog owner can learn how to properly trim their dog’s nails and every dog can be trained on how to tolerate the process. When the dog gets used to the entire process from a tender age, things get comfortable for both of you after some time.

You can try that big hug, yummy treat or the magical ‘who’s a good boy’ phrase before, during and after trimming his nails. Every pooch will appreciate this kind of attention as it is quite reassuring and sets a happy mood before you get started.

All in all, you may need a little help from the vet or groomer for you to be able to make the trims like a pro. You don’t have to hurt your pooch! Here’s all you need to know for you to do the nail trimming like an expert.

How do you trim the nails?

Before getting started on the nail trimming process, there are a few basics that you need to observe. The first step is to get some treats for your furry friend. The whole idea here is to make the experience positive and your dog will get comfortable in no time.

Also, you need to understand that you’re not obliged to trim all the nails at once. Nail trimming is a crucial thing and it needs some level of patience if you want to do it right.

From a tender age, train your dog to get accustomed to the handling of their ankles and toes. This way, the puppy will be acclimated early hence making her find nail trimming less intrusive later in life.

One technique that helps with nail trimming is holding the clippers against the dog’s toe pad then cutting across the nail. This way there will be lesser chances of cutting the nails too short or rupturing a blood vessel.

Keep these basics in mind:

  1. One of the most common mistakes is not using a sharp, good quality nail trimmer. A dull trimmer can bend and crack the nails and it could hurt your dog.
  2. When cutting nails, be aware of the “quick.” The quick is a blood vessel in the nail. It appears like a thin dark line running through the nail, but it is harder to see on black nails. If you are unsure where the quick ends, cut the nail in small increments and leave it a little longer. If you do cut the quick, the nail will bleed and your dog may yelp. You can stop the bleeding with styptic powder available at most pet stores.
  3. Cutting nails after a bath is not essential, but it is helpful since the water softens the nails and makes them easier to cut.

Reasons why you need to trim your dog’s nails

Just like the human nails, the dog’s nails are constantly growing. Although some of the dogs wear down their nails naturally when they spend a lot of time walking on concrete, gravel and pavements, this is not always the case with dogs that reside in the suburbs and spend most of the time indoors.

The long nails do not always dig into the footpad but the length tends to make it a little hard for the dog to walk on slick surfaces especially. In other cases, the long nails may get caught up on split ends hence exposing them to a higher risk of being torn.

This is a very painful experience for your dog and may even require sedation from the vet for treatment to be administered. Therefore, trim those nails unapologetically. It’s all for the good of your pooch.

How often should you trim your dog’s nails?

The intervals needed between every nail trimming session majorly depends on the dog breed among other factors. This is basically because the rate of nail growth, as well as the natural wear of nails, varies from one dog to another. If you need to know when is the right time, the rule of thumb is to trim your dog’s nails as soon as you see them touching the floor when she is standing.

Final Verdict

Nail trimming is a loving long-term service for your dog. Therefore, you need to remain reassuring and confident about the whole process.

I have a friend, May, who is a die-hard dog lover and lives nearby the Carolina Mountains. To her, nail trimming and clipping is never a favorite shared activity. One day, she went camping with her dog Jack. Due to his long nails, he damaged the tent floor. In the end, both May and Jack didn’t have a good night sleep. That is why it is important to always keep dogs’ nails short and tidy.

References

https://www.petmd.com/dog/grooming/evr_dg_how_to_trim_a_dogs_toenails

https://www.dummies.com/pets/dogs/how-to-trim-your-dogs-toenails/

https://www.vetbabble.com/dogs/grooming-dogs/trimming-dogs-nails/

Josh S. is the blog owner of kyrapets.com. On the site, he will share information helping dog owners.  He has a Staffordshire Bull Terrier whom he loves very dearly.


How Trained Therapy Dogs can Positively Impact Mental Health

Guest Post by Jennifer Scott

JuliaJaneta-unsplash.comDogs are often thought of as “man’s best friend.” This is especially true with individuals who are suffering from decreased mental health. Therapy dogs or “comfort dogs” have the job of supporting a person who is suffering from a mental disorder by providing comfort and attention. Therapy dogs often have very sweet demeanors and are full of love to give. They often live in homes, but they are also available to visit people in hospitals, schools, nursing homes, and hospice homes. Because they are patient and unbothered by strangers hugging them, they can improve the mental health of just about anyone.

Read on below to see how therapy dogs can positively impact mental health and give you a better outlook on life.

Improve Moods

Therapy dogs are known to be positive mood boosters for anyone suffering from autism, bipolar disorder, depression, ADHD, PTSD, and Alzheimer’s disease. This is because interacting with dogs can raise levels of oxytocin and dopamine, which are the feel-good hormones in our body. A dog has a way of adding unconditional love to your life, even if you’re suffering from a mental disorder. Dogs fulfill the basic human need of touch. In fact, they love to be pet, which only encourages us. Even when we’re stressed, just petting a dog can rapidly calm us down.

Decrease Stress

A side effect of a lot of different types of mental disorders is anxiety. Anyone with anxiety knows how hard it is to control. Therapy dogs can help with that because they decrease stress. Being around a trained cat or dog can lower your blood pressure, which is a big physical measure of stress. When you own a dog, you also get more exercise than people who don’t own a dog. That’s because you’re constantly taking your dog out for walks or outside to play. Exercise can help you greatly reduce stress and depression. Pets also help you stay in the moment and keep your focus on the now instead of worrying about past or future events.

Ease Loneliness

Low mental health can make you feel lonely. Therapy dogs can change that. Not only do pets provide companionship, but they encourage friendly interactions with others, which can lower your levels of depression. Pets change your perception of others -- and their perception of you. Pets make you appear more approachable, and in turn, you view anyone who has a pet to be more approachable. Dogs provide a great ice breaker when meeting strangers.

Go Outside

Whether you’re taking your dog on a walk or going to play fetch in the park, one thing is for sure: dogs get you outside. This is crucial when you’re suffering from low mental health because sun and fresh air can help elevate your mood, along with vitamin D exposure that you probably need. Vitamin D helps fight mental conditions, including depression. Getting outside also exposes you to nature, which has a way of calming us down. Taking a deep breath outside while taking in the view can help us stay present in the moment and give us a sense of calm.

Don’t Forget to Pet-Proof Your Home and Yard

You want your home to be safe for your therapy dog, so make sure to pet-proof it before you bring them home. This includes cleaning up any clutter around your home, putting any meditations in cabinets, putting away toxic chemicals, and keeping foods and plants out of reach. Pet-proofing your home also means making sure your backyard is safe for your pet. Choose dog-safe flowers and plants for your yard. Also, secure your trash cans and garbage from your pet. If you have a swimming pool, be sure to put a fence around it.

Talk to Your Pet

Above all else, if you ever feel like you have to get something off your chest but don’t want to confide in anyone close to you, your dog or cat can be a great listener. You can talk to your pet about your daily struggles, your hopes, your fears -- anything. And, they won’t judge you. It can be a great option for people who are too afraid to bring up issues to their family or friends.

Jennifer Scott has experienced anxiety and depression since she was a teenager. She shares stories about the ups and downs of her anxiety and depression at http://spiritfinder.org/

Image: Julia Janeta, Unsplash.com

 


Vaccine Clinic - Greenville, SC, Sep. 1

Screen Shot 2018-07-30 at 11.00.01 AMNo appointment necessary for the monthly Saturday Vaccine Clinic at Greenville Humane Society. Get all of your animal's shots starting at just $9, with no additional fees. Greenville Humane Society also offers heartworm testing, rabies vaccines, ear cleaning, microchipping and much more. Be sure to also get your pet's flea/tick/heartworm preventative while you're there!

The vaccine clinic is held the first Saturday of every month from 9 AM to 12 PM. The September vaccine clinic is September 1.

Greenville Humane Society also offers low-cost spay/neuter at just $20 for dogs under 25 pounds. Visit https://www.greenvillehumane.com/ for further information.


Low-cost Shot Clinic - Candler, Aug. 25

Praisaeng-freedigOn Saturday, July 28 from  12 - 3pm, there is a low-cost rabies and shot clinic with James Boatwright, DVM.

Pricing is as follows:

$15 / 1 year rabies

$20 / 3 year rabies  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)

$20 / DHPP combo for dogs

$10 / Lepto

$20 / Bordetella (dogs)

$25 / FVRCP/FELV combo for cats

This clinic is located at Candler Feed & Seed, 1275 Smokey Park Highway, Candler, NC.

For more information, call 1-828-553-5792

Image: Praisaeng, freedigitalphotos.net


Low-cost Shot Clinic - Candler, July 28

Praisaeng-freedigOn Saturday, July 28 from  12 - 3pm, there is a low-cost rabies and shot clinic with James Boatwright, DVM.

Pricing is as follows:

$15 / 1 year rabies

$20 / 3 year rabies  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)

$20 / DHPP combo for dogs

$10 / Lepto

$20 / Bordetella (dogs)

$25 / FVRCP/FELV combo for cats

This clinic is located at Candler Feed & Seed, 1275 Smokey Park Highway, Candler, NC.

For more information, call 1-828-553-5792

Image: Praisaeng, freedigitalphotos.net


Can Your Dog Get Water Intoxication?

Screen Shot 2018-07-02 at 1.38.49 PM
You're probably familiar with the concept of intoxication when it applies to humans who have to much to drink. Interestingly enough, intoxication is possible in dogs as well -- but it happens when they drink too much water.

Water intoxication is not common, but it is more possible during the summer months. This is when dogs tend to drink a lot of water to keep cool. They also could ingest large quantities of water when they are swimming or playing in streams, ponds and lakes. It is even possible to ingest water when playing with a garden hose.

TopDogTips.com has a handy infographic about water intoxication that details the risks, symptoms, and consequences of water intoxication. It also contains tips for prevention and home treatment, and it includes other water-related dangers for dogs.

You'll find the Water Intoxication infographic here: https://topdogtips.com/water-intoxication-in-dogs/


Top Four Toxic Items Dogs Ingest on July 4

Dog-2723108_640According to the ASPCA, there are four items that lead the list of toxic items ingested by dogs on July 4:

  1. Fireworks
  2. Certain foods
  3. Lawn products
  4. Pool chemicals

We often give our dogs credit for being intelligent in so many ways -- but when it comes to substances, most dogs will eat just about anything if they are curious or hungry. They can also be exposed to toxic substances unwittingly; for example, many products that you commonly apply to your lawn may be harmful to your pets.

For more information about the top four July 4 dangerous items, download the ASPCA flyer at the link below.

Download ASPCATop4July4

 

 


How Much Sleep Does Your Dog Need?

Guest post by Brian Morgan

Dog-848390_1280It is no secret that dogs love sleeping. In fact, they spend most of the day laying on the sofa and snoozing. Therefore, we often blame them of being lazy. However, this statement cannot be further from the truth. Because of their biological clocks and sleeping patterns, dogs have higher sleeping requirements.

Generally speaking dogs spend about 12 to 14 hours per day sleeping. Since dogs tend to adjust their sleeping patterns according to the owners’ patterns, their sleeps are not continuous nor equally divided. Usually dogs sleep 8 hours during the night and the remaining 4 to 6 hours occur during the day in the form of naps.

How dogs spend their days

Humans follow a binary sleeping pattern that consists of 12 hours awake during the day and about 8 hours of sleep during the night. Dogs do not have strict and preconceived sleeping patterns.

On average, most adult dogs spend around 50 percent of the day sleeping, around 30 percent of the day resting, and around 20 percent of the day being physically active.

The sleeping portion includes the long night sleep and the short naps during the day. While resting, dogs are awake but physically inactive. The physically active portion of the day includes all physical activities from walking and running to playing fetch and tug-of-wars.  

The dog’s sleeping pattern

The dog’s sleeping pattern is similar to ours. The first phase of sleeping is the slow one and it manifests with slower breathing, blood pressure dropping and heart rate decrease. This phase lasts for 10 minutes. After that, dogs enter the second, rapid eye movement (REM) phase. As the name suggests this phase manifests with fast rolling of the eyes under the closed eyelids.          

The only difference between the human and the canine sleeping pattern is the time spent in REM phase. REM is also the phase in which active dreaming occurs. While humans spend up to 25 percent of sleep in REM, due to their inconsistent sleeping schedules, dogs are in the REM phase for only 10 percent of the total sleep time. Because of the shorter REM phase, dogs need more total sleep make up for the shorter REM.

Simply put, although dogs sleep longer than we do, they do not sleep as soundly and they need to compensate for the lost REM’s.

Factors influencing the dog’s sleeping pattern

Adult dogs spend around 12-14 hours per day on sleeping, while young puppies tend to sleep for more than 18 hours per day. However, the exact time a dog spends on sleeping depends on several factors such as:

  • Breed – large dog breeds sleep longer than small dog breeds. Additionally, how much the dog will sleep depends on what it is bred for. For example, working dogs have lower sleeping needs than dogs bred to be companions.
  • Age – young puppies and senior dogs have higher sleeping requirements
  • Exercise regimen – as contradictory as it may sound, active dogs need less sleep than dogs with sedentary lifestyles
  • Environment – dogs that live in environments with extensive mental stimulations tend to sleep longer.

Changes in the sleeping habits

Sudden changes in the dog’s sleeping schedule may be a cause for alarm and can signalize certain health issues. The most common reasons why your dog’s sleeping pattern can be altered include:

  • Low-quality diet – bad diets make dogs sleep longer because they either do not provide enough nutrients or are hard to digest and require more energy for proper digestion
  • Poor health – cardiovascular conditions, inactive thyroid glands, diabetes and canine depression are all linked to altered sleeping patterns and can significantly influence the dog’s sleeping needs.

Changes in the sleeping habits are normal in older, senior dogs. Senior dogs tend to sleep longer during the day and they also tend to get up more frequently during the night simply because life becomes harder with age. This may seem weird at first, but it is a natural part of the ageing process.  

Doggy sleep disorders

The most common doggy sleep disorders include:

  • Narcolepsy – indicates excessive daytime napping manifested with sudden falling in deep sleep and it usually involves partial or complete muscle paralysis.
  • Insomnia – sleeplessness is quite rare in dogs and it is almost always due to health issues.
  • Sleep apnea – loud snoring caused to heavy and temporarily stopped breathing that causes the dog to wake up. If it occurs frequently it can lead to tiredness during the day.

All dog parents are well aware of how much their canine babies enjoy sleeping. To be honest, when it comes to dogs, extensive sleep is physiologically required. To properly function and stay well-rested, dogs need a good night's sleep and frequent day naps. 

Dogs are flexible sleepers capable of falling asleep out of boredom. They are also capable of waking up easily and becoming alert immediately after the waking. Because of this inconsistent and irregular sleeping pattern dogs need a lot of sleep. Additionally dogs do not sleep deeply and tend to wake up a lot.

If your dog does not follow its usual sleeping pattern, do not hesitate to contact the vet.

Brian Morgan is the editor for DogBedZone a website providing tips, guides, and resources for dog owners.

Image: Mathey, Pixabay.com


Monthly Low Cost Vaccines Starting in May in Hendersonville

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 5.15.10 PMIn an effort to make vaccinations accessible and affordable to the animal and residents of Henderson County, Blue Ridge Humane Society now offers low cost vaccines the third Monday of every month from 1:00 PM – 5:30 PM at our Adoption Center beginning May 2018. The Adoption Center is located at 88 Centipede Lane in Hendersonville, NC.

Before administering vaccinations, pets receive an examination from a licensed veterinarian, and owners are educated about the importance of preventive care when it comes to their pets health.

To receive vaccinations at a Blue Ridge Humane Society clinic, pet owners must meet ONE of the below required criteria:

  • Receive Public Assistance (SNAP, DSS, SSI, SSDI, unemployment, disability, Medicaid)
  • Fall below HUD Income Guidelines
  • Full-time college student
  • Military Service Member or Veteran

The day of the vaccinations, pet owners must bring with them the following items:

  • Please bring proof of prior vaccinations including a Rabies Certificate (a rabies tag will not count).
  • All animals should be in good health and have not shown previous signs of aggression.
  • All cats should be in carriers and all dogs should be leashed upon arrival.
  • Owner must bring proof of how they meet the required criteria for vaccination at a Blue Ridge Humane Society.
 Vaccine Prices
  • Rabies 1 year (Dogs or cats over 3 months) – $10.00
  • Rabies 3 year (Dogs or cats with rabies certificate, a tag will not count as proof of previous vaccination) – $10.00
  • Bordetella  (Dogs over 2 months) – $10.00
  • DA2PPV (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks) – $10.00
  • FVRCP (Cats over 2 months) – $10.00
  • Microchip (Dogs or cats over 2 months) -$15.00

For more information, visit: https://www.blueridgehumane.org/community-services/low-cost-vaccines/


Be Aware of Household Poisons

ID-100395000According to the ASPCA, "Toxic chemicals, dangerous plants, as well as products and substances found in our everyday surroundings can be poisonous or even fatal to animals. Unfortunately, a pet can ingest a household chemical, lap up a liquid, or chew on a seemingly harmless plant -- and become sick and even die."

The ASPCA's Poison Control Center has put together a helpful brochure that lists in detail common household hazards, has poison prevention tips, and discusses how to put together a poison safety kit for your dog or cat. The Poison Control Center also provides a hotline staffed by veterinarians who can advise you in case of emergency. You can reach them 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, at 888-426-4435.

Download a free copy of the ASPCA Poison Control Center brochure at the link below (PDF).

Download Aspca household hazards

Image: Alex Ugalek, freedigitalphotos.net


Low Cost Vaccinations - Asheville, March 24

AHS Low Cost VaccinationsAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Saturday, March 24 from 2 to 5 PM at Groce United Methodist Church, 954 Tunnel Road, Asheville, NC 28805. No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.


ReTail Scene: NC Company Offers Dog Nutrition and Health App

Screen Shot 2018-02-20 at 3.51.06 PMPetrics, a Wilmington, NC pet technology company, is now offering a health and nutrition application for pets that "gives you the tools necessary to ensure proper diet and safety for your pet." The application features:

  • A database of over 15,000 pet foods and treats that can be scientifically matched and personalized to your dog's individual needs
  • A comprehensive ingredients analyzer
  • At home delivery and auto-ordering of pet foods
  • Pet food recommendations based on genetic risks and pre-existing medical conditions
  • Schedule reminders for vet visits and medications
  • Recall alerts

The app can be downloaded free. More information is available at: https://www.petrics.com/

This company has also just introduced the world's first connected pet bed, which maintains a comfortable temperature for your dog and also reports on body temperature, heart rate, and other data.


The Benefits of Grain-Free Dog Food

Guest Post by Olivia Williams

ID-10049938Dog-lovers everywhere simply want the best for their pooches. And when it comes to providing our four-legged, furry friends optimum nutrition, many of us would rather choose grain-free dog food for a variety of reasons, many of which are tied to the benefits of grain-free dog food. Here are some of them:

  • More nutrients per gram of dog food

 Ancestral dogs always preferred meats over any other type of food. However, today’s dogs aren’t necessarily carnivores; in fact, they are omnivores like you and me.

Sadly, with the commercialization of dog food, companies sometimes minimize production costs. Instead of putting high-quality ingredients in sufficient amounts into dog food, some companies use ‘fillers’ in the form of wheat, corn, and other cereal grains for the simple fact that these are generally ‘cheaper’ than protein like beef or chicken. That is why low-quality dog foods will have a greater proportion of these so-called ‘fillers’ that do not necessarily contain all the right amounts of nutrients needed by your pooch.

But when you give your dog grain-free food, you are almost certain that the ‘fillers’ have been significantly replaced with more nutritious ingredients such as wholesome grains, vegetables, and fruits as well as more protein like chicken, beef, turkey, and others. This simply means you are giving your dog more nutrients for exactly the same amount of dog food.

  • Less incidence of food allergies

 Wheat, corn, and soy, as well as other cereal grains, are considered allergenic. Chicken, pork, and beef as well as any other food that has protein in it can also be allergenic. The good news is that the digestive system of a dog is naturally designed to digest proteins from animal sources a lot more efficiently than they do proteins coming from cereal grains. This leads to fewer incidences of food allergies and other forms of allergies in dogs. The reason is simple. Because an allergic reaction is triggered by the exposure of a protein molecule to immune system cells, digesting large proteins into peptides and amino acids eliminates this antigen-recognition capability of immune system cells.

 Since dogs are able to digest animal proteins into amino acids, they experience less stomach upsets and other symptoms of food allergies. On the other hand, since they cannot process cereal grain proteins into amino acids that efficiently, some of the undigested proteins are ‘sensed’ by the immune system of the dog, triggering an allergic response.

  • More energy to support your dog’s lifestyle

 It is important to distinguish the difference between a grain-free and carb-free dog diet. Dogs, like us, rely on carbohydrates for energy. This is especially true if you’re the type of dog-owner who goes on a trek with your pooch on the trails of the Blue Ridge Mountains or even the Great Smoky Mountains. They will need energy for the adventure. While cereal grains are a good source of carbohydrates, these are not the only sources. For instance, sweet potatoes and rice, often found in grain-free food, are excellent sources of carbohydrates for your pooch. They’re generally friendly to the tummy, too. This can help support your dog’s active lifestyle.

  • Healthier skin and coat

 Trekking in the Blue Ridge Mountains means exposing your dogs to the elements, not to mention objects and particles that can irritate its skin and make its coat frizzled. Since a grain-free dog diet has more nutrients that come from healthier grains, fruits, and vegetables, you can feel more confident about promoting healthier coat and skin for your pet. This is the function of antioxidants that are mostly found in many fruits and vegetables. As such, dog foods that are rich with these kinds of nutrients can help improve the condition of your pet’s skin and coat.

  • Less shedding

 Because your dog’s coat is naturally healthier brought about by the various nutrients that are supplied to every hair root, your pooch will have lesser incidence of shedding. Your dog will still shed its fur, but this will be significantly less than if your pet were on a dog food that contains cereal grains. This can also translate to easier cleaning of your upholstery and carpet at home.

There are many other reasons why pet parents today would want grain-free dog food for their beloved pets. You only want to give your dog the best nutrition possible, just like any responsible parent would give to her kids.

Olivia Williams is mum of 2 and a true animal lover with 3 dogs, 2 cats and a parrot called Charlie. Heading up the content for MyPetNeedsThat.com amongst a busy family schedule, her goal is to try help people all around the world become better pet owners.

Image: Aopsan, Freedigitalphotos.net


Low Cost Vaccinations - Candler, Feb. 24

AHS Low Cost VaccinationsAsheville Humane Society offers pet owners access to low cost vaccinations, microchips and ID tagging.

Come to a low cost vaccination clinic on Saturday, February 24 from 11 AM to 2 PM at Francis Asbury United Methodist Church, 725 Asbury Road, Candler, NC. No appointment is necessary.

Services provided:

Rabies 1 year  |  (Dogs or cats over 3 months)  |  $10.00
Rabies 3 year  |  (Dogs or cats with rabies paper certificate)  |  $10.00  
-Rabies tags are not accepted as proof of rabies vaccination-
Bordetella - Kennel cough  |  (Dogs over 2 months)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV - |  (Dogs 6 to 12 weeks or under 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
DA2PPV + Lepto - |  (Dogs 12 weeks or older and over 25 lbs)  |  $15.00
FVRCP/FELV - Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia and Leukemia  |  (Cats over 2 months)  | $20.00
FVRCP  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
FELV |  (Cats over 2 months)  |   $15.00
Microchip  |  (Dogs or cats over 2 months)  |  $15.00

Please note: Cash is the only accepted form of payment.


Do You Sleep with Your Dog?

Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 4.35.23 PMAbout half of U.S. pet owners sleep with their pets, and about 45 percent of dog owners sleep with their dogs.

Do you sleep with your dog? If so, you are definitely not alone! But there are some things that you should know about sleeping with your dog. There are health benefits and health risks, for example, and there are tips to make the experience more enjoyable for both of you.

The folks at Tuck.com, whose aim is to to improve sleep hygiene, health, and wellness through the creation and dissemination of comprehensive, unbiased, free resources, have put together "Sleeping with Pets." This informative guide answers a lot of questions about sleeping with your dog, including one all dog owners wonder about: "Is snoring normal for dogs?"

You'll find this free guide here:  https://www.tuck.com/sleeping-with-pets/

Image: Tuck.com


How to Perform CPR on Your Dog

ID-100238757It's a scary scenario: Your dog chokes, stops breathing, or is unconscious. You know you need to get your dog to the vet or emergency animal hospital, but you can take some simple steps first that may save your dog's life.

In an article that originally appeared on DogHeirs.com and was republished with permission by Reshareworthy.com, you'll find detailed instructions for performing CPR on your dog. Three specific actions are recommended:

  1. Perform 100-120 chest compressions per minute
  2. Perform a compression to mouth-to-snout ventilation ratio of 30 compressions followed by 2 breaths
  3. Perform cardiac massage / chest compressions according to the different chest types and sizes of dogs.

The article includes illustrations as well as a video that will be very helpful in applying these techniques properly. Performing CPR on your dog is not unlike performing it on humans -- and it could make the difference between life and death.

Find the article here: http://www.reshareworthy.com/cpr-for-dogs-and-cats/

Image: Photokanok, Freedigitalphotos.net


Oil Diffusers can be Dangerous to Dogs

Screen Shot 2018-01-19 at 3.49.32 PMThis is an alert from the ASPCA...

"If you have been on social media lately, you may have seen articles or posts concerning essential oils, oil diffusers and the potential danger they may pose to your pets. Essential oils have been, for a long time, a popular home remedy for a number of maladies including nasal congestion, anxiety, sore muscles and skin conditions, among others. With the sudden popularity of oil diffusers—an easy way to release these oils into your home—there has been an emergence of alarm about how these oils may affect animals in the home.

"In their concentrated form (100%), essential oils can absolutely be a danger for pets. Dogs and cats who have either walked through oils, gotten some on their coat or had oils placed directly on them can develop health concerns.

Symptoms include:

  • Unsteadiness on the feet
  • Depression
  • Low body temperature (in severe cases)

 If a pet ingested concentrated essential oils, you may see vomiting, diarrhea and depression, as well."

For more information about the possible dangers of oil diffusers, go to:

https://www.aspca.org/news/latest-home-trend-harmful-your-pets-what-you-need-know