Natural Nutritional Supplements for Your Dog

Guest Post by Jeffrey Lewis

Golden-retriever-puppy-2706672_1920Healthy eating is not just limited to humans. Your dogs also need a well-balanced diet to ensure their good health and longevity. A nutritious diet steers the way for their overall well-being.

Just imagine how much joy your dog brings to you. In return, you should give him all the care that he deserves.

In order to make sure that your dogs are healthy in every way, you need to give them a diet that is full of essential nutrients that are much needed for their overall growth and development.

Commercially available pet foods claim to contain all the nutrients required by your dog. But in reality, such dog food lacks nutrients that are necessary to improve your dog’s health. In order to make up for this, you need to give them extra supplementation. There are so many natural supplements available that improve your dog's body functions and are helpful in maintaining their overall health.

Here are some of the most important natural supplements for your dog's growth and development.

  • Good Fatty Acids

In order to make sure that your dog’s skin is healthy enough, you need to add beneficial fatty acids in their diet. The most important fatty acids include Omega-3 and Omega-6. These fatty acids are good for the nourishment for a dog’s skin and coat and can be really useful to relieve inflammation and itching. You just need to give these fatty acid supplements to your dogs for a few months and you’ll see good results. Apart from that, these fatty acids also help in reliving arthritis and seasonal allergies.

  • Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has many benefits for dogs. It is commonly available. Give it orally to your dog or topically apply it on the skin for better results. It has antibacterial and antifungal properties so it is very effective in curing and preventing bacterial and fungal infections in your dog. It is also very good for the immune system.

  • Mineral Salt

Salt is an essential ingredient in our diet. But did you know that it is also required by your dogs in a very small quantity, due to all the minerals it provides. The best salt for this purpose is Himalayan pink salt which is one of the purest salts available. It is free from contamination and other additives and chemicals. It has about 84 minerals and trace elements that are essential to fulfill the mineral requirement in your dog.

This salt has many benefits for your dog such as maintaining blood pressure, improving digestion, balancing pH and reducing water retention in body. Put it into the food or use in the form of salt licks for your dog’s health. These salt lick are a fun and convenient way to get most of the benefits of this salt.

  • Vitamins

As in humans, vitamins are very important for the dogs as well. Many dog foods contain vitamins in trace quantity. Some of the most important vitamins are vitamin A, B complex, C, D, E, and K. Dogs of different ages require them in different amounts. Some vitamins act as antioxidants and some help in digestion, and promoting healthy skin and hair.

  • Coconut Oil

You can give this oil orally as a supplement to your dog or can apply it topically on the skin. It is effective in both ways. It is an amazing moisturizer and provides relief from many skin conditions such as itchiness, ringworm, dandruff, and dryness. It is also very helpful in improving cognitive functions and gut health.

  • Glucosamine

Glucosamine naturally occurs in the joints and maintain the flexibility and mobility in dogs. With age, its production decreases due to which older dogs suffer from joint pain and difficult mobility. Giving a glucosamine supplement to your dog will maintain the healthy joints and regenerate cartilage to prevent joint problems.

Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mineral_lick

Jeffrey Lewis is a blogger at Ittefaq Salt. His aim is to create a beautiful, thriving life and help others to do the same. He is a crazy animal lover who enjoys writing about pets, animals, health and nutrition-related topics.

Editor's note: Dog owners should always consult their veterinarian about the nutritional supplements recommended for their particular dog.


POOCH PATHS: Hominy Creek River Park

Hominy creek river parkHominy Creek River Park may be one of Asheville's hidden gems for dog owners. This park is tucked away off Brevard Road in West Asheville at 194 Hominy Creek Road. 

Hominy Creek River Park is a great "Pooch Path" because it has a long, paved walking trail right along the French Broad River. In fact, it is part of the French Broad River Greenway -- so you can actually walk your dog all the way from Hominy Creek River Park, through Carrier Park, to the dog park at French Broad River Park. Even if you don't want to go quite that far (over two miles), the walk in Hominy Creek River Park is pleasant in any season. Most of the trail is flat, wide and paved. It does cross under a busy highway, but the view of the river and the kayakers makes up for it.

Hominy Creek River Park has a small parking area, grills and picnic tables, and it is also an outpost for French Broad Outfitters. The park is open until dark.

Looking for more "Pooch Paths" to enjoy with your dog? You'll find them in "Pooch Paths: Dog Walks and Hikes in Asheville and Beyond." This handy eBook lists more than thirty dog walks and hikes and has helpful tips. It is available in all eBook formats as well as a PDF for just 99 cents. See a sample and order it here. Screen Shot 2018-11-26 at 10.58.07 AM


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, Dec. 16

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, December 16. Start time is 10 AM (note new time) for repeat hikers and 9:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Do You Have a Pet Emergency Plan?

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After Hurricane Florence made landfall in North Carolina in September, dozens of people had died, hundreds of homes had been flooded, and countless of properties had been destroyed. The tragedy had been compounded by the fact that many animals were trapped in their flooded homes. Some pet owners had decided to save themselves, leaving their precious companions behind. As a result, there had been over a hundred pets rescued by volunteers in North Carolina alone days after the hurricane.

Pets trapped and left behind is a truly heartbreaking and distressing scene. But in case of powerful natural disasters, humans are often forced to choose between saving themselves and taking everything—including their pets—with them.

We hope we never, ever have to make that choice. We can’t prevent natural disasters, but we can prepare so that our beloved pets are taken care of always, even if we can’t be with them during an emergency.

That's why every pet owner should have a pet emergency plan, no matter how unlikely they think their pets could encounter natural disasters. We can’t physically be there with them all the time, but we can ensure that no harm would come to them.

Check out this great infographic that explains step-by-step how to create your own pet emergency plan:
https://www.mikesgearreviews.com/pet-emergency-plan-disaster-preparedness-pets/


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, Dec. 9

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, December 9. Start time is 10 AM (note new time) for repeat hikers and 9:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Health Alert for the Holiday Season

StuartMiles-fdpGetting into the holiday spirit often means imbibing alcoholic drinks and baking holiday goodies. Well it turns out that both of those human actions have largely unknown risks to your pet.

Read this important health alert from the ASPCA. While it is written for animal care professionals, it has valuable information for dog owners. Use the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center as a resource for questions about any substances your pet may ingest.

Alcoholic drinks and yeast dough both have the potential to cause toxicity in pets, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center notes that pets seem to find both quite palatable.

Even though signs you’ll see from the ethanol are the same for both exposures, there can be some differences in the onset of clinical signs as well as some additional concerns.

Palatable Poison

Many dogs (and some cats) will happily lap up a cocktail that is left on the table. Parties are a very common time for pets to get into alcohol as drinks are often left unattended. The onset of action with alcoholic beverages is typically fast (within 30 minutes, potentially faster with higher dosages).

The opportunity for emesis with alcohol is often very short and is not recommended in symptomatic pets. 

Rising yeast dough (such as bread, roll, and pizza dough) is often seen as a tasty snack by pets. The yeast ferments the carbohydrates in the dough, producing carbon dioxide and ethanol. Unfortunately, this process continues in the warm, damp environment of a dog or cat’s stomach as well.

Treatment for Dough Ingestion

There are a couple of special considerations for bread dough that you won’t see when pets get into alcoholic drinks. The amount of dough ingested can be an issue. You can potentially see food bloat or even GDV, especially considering that the stomach can be distended with carbon dioxide.

With bread dough, you may see excellent emesis results (often the 1 pound dough will come up in a single lump, (though there are some cases with little to no recovery of the dough with emesis). When good emesis results are obtained, there will be a much faster resolution of clinical signs.

The onset of clinical signs is much more variable with yeast dough than alcoholic drinks – it can potentially take hours to see signs of intoxication.   

Results of Ethanol Ingestion

Ethanol intoxication from either dough or drinks can cause ataxia, depression, recumbency, hypothermia, disorientation, vocalization, acidosis, tachycardia, dyspnea, aspiration pneumonia, tremors, coma and seizures.

Treatment is largely supportive and symptomatic. Aspiration is common, so antiemetics are indicated. Airway protection may also be indicated in some cases. Monitor acid base status and correct acidosis, fluid therapy for support, monitor for hypoglycemia and supplement dextrose as needed. Diazepam can be given for seizures – and some comatose pets will need ventilatory support.

Image: Stuart Miles, Freedigitalphotos.net


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, Dec. 2

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, December 2. Start time is 10 AM (note new time) for repeat hikers and 9:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


What Nutrients Control Shedding in Your Dog

Guest Post by Mark Young

ID-10032366Shedding is a natural process that just seems to come with the territory when you're a dog owner. In some cases, excessive shedding can be a sign of an underlying nutrient deficiency.  When this happens your dog's hair and skin might be more dry and brittle than usual.  This can cause their hair to fall out more easily, and brittle hair is also prone to splitting and breaking.  Continue reading on if you want to learn more about some key nutrients that can help alleviate this problem.

Essential Fatty Acids

Essential fatty acids are some of the most important nutrients when it comes to a dog's overall skin and hair health.  The two main fats your dog will need to keep hair loss under control are Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. 

Most dogs already get enough Omega-6 fats in their regular diet, but in most cases, they won't be getting enough Omega-3 fats from a regular commercial dog food. 

You can either supplement your dog's diet with fish oil or flax seed oil since they are both great sources of Omega-3 fatty acids.  There are also some dog foods out there that have been specially formulated to control shedding. Alternatively, if you really want to spoil your dog you can feed them grass-fed beef which tends to have a higher Omega-3 content.

When you feed your dog enough of these healthy fats their skin will retain moisture better.  In addition, their hair will look more lustrous since a thin layer of natural oil will protect their hair from drying out and becoming brittle.

Biotin

Sometimes excessive shedding can be caused by a biotin deficiency.  The signs of biotin deficiency include dry flaky skin,  excessive shedding, and a lot of itching and scratching.  Your dog's nails may also become brittle, and they can suffer joint problems if the biotin deficiency is not corrected.

Luckily biotin is produced in small quantities in your dog's intestines by beneficial bacteria.  If your dog has intestinal problems, though, then the bacteria in their gut might not be producing enough biotin.  Also, if your dog has recently been on a course of antibiotics the beneficial bacteria might have been killed off.

To play it safe you can feed your dog foods that are rich in biotin so you can be sure they are getting enough of this vital nutrient.  Some foods that are excellent sources of biotin include egg yolks, liver, meat, and some leafy green vegetables.

Protein

When most people think of hair loss they don't tend to think about protein.  In reality, a dogs hair is made of keratin which is actually 60 to 90 percent protein.   Since dogs have a lot of hair a good percentage of the protein they consume is used to produce all of that keratin. 

Most dogs tend to eat a high protein diet, so we often think that our dog is at least getting enough of this nutrient.  There are cases where a dog might have problems digesting protein, so even if it seems like they are eating enough protein they still might not be absorbing it. 

If your dog has problems digesting protein you can add digestive enzymes to their food.  The digestive enzymes will break down the protein into amino acids, which will be much easier for your dog's intestines to absorb.

If your dog is a picky eater that might also lead to a protein deficiency.  In that case, you will have to figure out a way to get them to eat enough protein by offering them treats, or giving them supplements. 

An average adult dog needs to consume at least 18 percent of their calories in the form of protein.  While puppies will need to eat a diet made up of at least 22 percent protein to fuel their rapid development.   As long as you hit these targets you can be sure a protein deficiency is not at the root of your dog's hair loss problem.

Mark Young is an avid pet lover and writer on ThePetSupplyGuy.com. When he is not writing he spends his time taking care of his wide assortment of pets, and he also volunteers his time at local animal shelters.

Image: Anankkml, Freedigitalphotos.net


$8.28 Adoptions in the "828" - Now Through Nov. 17

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Asheville has been voted the "Quirkiest town in America," and we as a community celebrate the quirky qualities that make our town and residents stand out from the crowd!

Help Asheville Humane Society "Keep Asheville Humane Weird" by celebrating our local, unique pets for adoption! For less than the cost of your next tattoo, give a permanent place in your heart to a forever friend. Whether you're a "cat weirdo" or a "dog weirdo," Asheville Humane has got the pet for you!

Now through Saturday, November 17, all animals over six months old are just $8.28!

Although the love of a pet is priceless, all of the following are still included when you adopt! Each adoption fee includes spay/neuter, all up-to-date vaccines, behavioral training when appropriate, microchip and free 1-year registration, a free starter bag of food, and a free wellness visit with a participating veterinarian. 

To see available animals, visit www.ashevillehumane.org. The Adoption Center is located at 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market). It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 AM to 6 PM (Tuesdays until 7 PM). The dog and cat rooms are closed daily for naptime from 1 to 2 PM, giving animals a much-needed break. The lobby remains open where you can speak with staff, enjoy refreshments, read or watch videos!


Hard 2 Recycle - Arden, Nov. 17

Screen Shot 2018-10-31 at 4.05.47 PMThe next Hard 2 Recycle event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 17 from 10 AM to 2 PM at TC Roberson High School, 250 Overlook Road, Arden/Asheville, NC. In addition to books, cardboard, electronic items, batteries, printer cartridges, and more, you can drop off the following items for Asheville Humane Society:

  • plastic totes
  • shoe boxes
  • crates (wire/plastic)
  • towels, blankets
  • pet toys, non-pellet stuffed animals
  • leashes (non-retractable)
  • unopened dry pet food
  • clay kitty litter
  • cleaning supplies

For further details, visit: https://www.ashevillegreenworks.org/hard-2-recycle.html


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, Nov. 18

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, November 18. Start time is 9 AM for repeat hikers and 8:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


A Guide to Adopting Your First Dog

Guest Post by Jennifer Scott

Editor's Note: While most Carolina Mountain Dog readers already have dogs, this article will be very helpful if you plan to adopt another dog. Or, please pass it along to a first-time adopter.

AngelinaLitvin-unsplash.comWhen you get the idea to adopt a dog, it’s hard to shake. Suddenly you see floppy ears, furry paws and wet noses everywhere you go. Dogs provide their owners with unending and unconditional love. They are always excited to see their humans walk through the front door no matter how long they’ve been away from home.

Each dog has their own personality and moods, but all-in-all pups are cheerful, kind, funny and completely lovable. Owning a dog is also healthy. Having a canine companion provides plenty of exercise and dog ownership has been shown to help lower blood pressure, cholesterol levels and feelings of loneliness

Convinced adopting a dog is right for you? Read on for advice on picking out a pup and helping them adjust to your home those first few weeks.

Finding a Lifestyle Companion

The best dog for you is the one that is going to fit into your lifestyle. For instance, if you are an active person who likes to spend their weekends running trails and hiking mountains, adopting an active breed that can keep up with you for miles means you have a new exercise buddy that is always game. People who live in apartments or homes without yards, on the other hand, would do better with a lazier pup that prefers the comforts of the great indoors over being exposed to the elements. Talk with an animal adoption specialist about what you expect from pet ownership so they can make the best match possible.

Preparing Your Home for Pet Ownership

Bringing your new best friend home for the first time may be exciting for you, but entering a new environment full of strange sights and smells can be overwhelming for a dog. To make it easier, have everything clean and set up before you bring your dog home. Have water and food bowls set in their designated spot where it is easy for your pup to find them. Have plenty of treats, chews, and a good supply of limited-ingredient dog food on hand. Setting up a bed for your dog to enjoy in communal living areas gives them a space to sit so they aren’t jumping on furniture and taking up your spot on the couch. When you bring your pup home, let them explore these areas and figure things out themselves and they’ll settle in no time.

Beyond preparing your home for your dog, you also want to prepare yourself. Having everything you may need to address an emergency (or maybe not-so-emergency) situations. Pick out a veterinarian and schedule a meet-and-greet visit shortly after you adopt. Locate an animal emergency clinic nearby so you don’t have to waste time looking up options if your dog needs immediate medical help.

Also invest in plenty of cleaning supplies that combat pet hair, dander, and drool. This includes having a quality vacuum cleaner. Keeping a pet-friendly model like the Dirt Devil Razor Pet in a common room gives you access to dirt-busting power anytime you see a tumbleweed of hair blow across your floor.

Adopt Don’t Shop

People might like to buy purebred dogs because they are predictable. But unless you plan to show or breed, there really isn’t a good reason to drop $500 to $3,000 minimum on a pet when there are hundreds of thousands of animals in shelters waiting for a person like you to take them home. If you buy a dog at a pet store, you are very likely supporting puppy mills, which typically raise dogs in horrible conditions. Sure, shelters have their fair share of problem pooches. However, if you work with an adoption specialist at your local shelter you can find a canine companion that fits perfectly into your home and lifestyle.

When you adopt a shelter animal:

  • Another spot at the shelter opens for another animal in need
  • You make the marketplace less profitable for puppy mills
  • Your new pup comes with some basic training via shelter employees
  • You save money on adoption fees, microchips, and initial vet costs
  • The money you give to the shelter goes back into a good cause
  • The dog you adopt is forever grateful for what you’ve done
  • You save a dog’s life

If you are interested in dog ownership, don’t go for purebred unless you are looking to show or breed. Instead, turn to your local shelter to find the perfect lifestyle companion while doing some good. You perfect dog is going to be the kind that reflects your likes and interests. For instance, active people should pick out a dog that can play for hours. When preparing the home for the dog’s arrival, make sure it’s ready by having all of the pup’s possessions out and ready to be used. Furthermore, prepare yourself with vet information and cleaning supplies that take care of all kinds of emergencies.

Jennifer Scott has experienced anxiety and depression since she was a teenager. She shares stories about the ups and downs of her anxiety and depression at https://spiritfinder.org/

Image: Unsplash.com


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, Nov. 11

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, November 11. Start time is 9 AM for repeat hikers and 8:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Happy Mutt Benefit Party - Tryon, Nov. 10

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Join Foothills Humane Society at the "Happy Mutt Benefit Party" on Saturday, November 10, 11 AM to 3 PM, at Tryon Depot, 22 Depot Street, Tryon, NC

• Hot and cold buffet includes oil and vinegar delights
• Music by Daniel Keller, jazz guitarist/music teacher
• Music by Dr. Iain Fitch, DVM, CVC, Native American flutes
• Happy mutts to pet and adopt with assurance at an event fee special of only $10 from the Foothills Humane Society
• Goin’ to the Dogs silent auction and “raffle”
• 15% discount at the store, Saturday 11/10, to celebrate Jessica’s birthday

*Advance tickets needed! Buy now at A Taste of Olives
& Grapes, 10 N. Trade St.,Tryon, NC • 828-859-0212


Vaccine Clinic - Greenville, SC, Nov. 3

Screen Shot 2018-01-19 at 4.16.20 PMGreenville Humane Society holds a monthly vaccine clinic the first Saturday of the month. In February, the clinic will be held on Saturday, November 3 from 9 AM to 12 PM. All dogs must be leashed and all cats must be in carriers.

No appointment is necessary. Get all of your animal's shots starting at just $9, with no additional fees. All fees go directly back to care for the animals they serve. They also offer heartworm testing, rabies vaccines, ear cleaning, microchipping and much more. Be sure to get your pet's flea/tick/heartworm preventative while you're at the clinic!

Greenville Humane Society's facility is located at 305 Airport Road in Greenville, SC. For more information, including a detailed list of vaccination prices, go to: https://www.greenvillehumane.com/vaccine-clinic/


Halloween and Your Dog

Dog-714861_1920Halloween may be a fun holiday for humans, but it can be pretty scary, and sometimes dangerous, for dogs. Here are some valuable Halloween safety tips from the ASPCA's Animal Poison Control Center:

Lock Candy Away
Kids love to stash candy in their rooms, but a dog’s keen sense of smell will lead him to even the most cleverly hidden treasure. Contact a veterinary professional right away if your pet does get into Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or is sugar-free and contains xylitol.

Ditto the Glow Sticks
Glow sticks are used to help keep kids safe while they are out in the dark. Pets (especially cats) find these glow sticks to be a lot of fun and often puncture them. While most of the sticks are labeled as non-toxic, they do have an extremely bitter taste and pets who bite into them may begin drooling and racing around the house. A little treat or sip of milk will usually stop the taste reaction.

Have Pets Identified and Visible
There are a lot of extra people on the streets at Halloween, and that combined with strange costumes can spook pets and cause them to bolt. If you take your pet out after dark, make sure he or she wears a reflective collar and is securely leashed. And make sure your pet has proper identification on the collar.

Keep Pets Calm
Even pets who are kept indoors may experience intense anxiety over the large number of strangely dressed visitors. Keeping your pet away from trick-or-treaters may do the trick, but if you think more will be needed be sure and speak with your vet well in advance about options to help calm your pet.

Check Those Costumes
Costumes can be fun for the whole family. However, if you are planning on dressing up your best bud, ensure that the costume fits well and isn’t going to slip and tangle the pet or cause a choking hazard if chewed on. And never leave a costumed pet unattended.

 


Hiking Hounds - Asheville, Nov. 4

Hiking houndsHiking Hounds is one of the most popular Asheville Humane Society volunteer activities. Each month, volunteers take shelter dogs on hikes as part of the enrichment programming. You'll spend a few hours in Bent Creek hiking the trails with dogs who will love you for it.

The next hike with the Hiking Hounds group is Sunday, November 4. Start time is 9 AM for repeat hikers and 8:30 AM for new hikers. Hikers generally return to the shelter at 16 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville around 11:30 AM to 12 PM. Note: New and repeat hikers alike are required to sign up in advance. If you'd like to sign up for this hike, email ahshikinghounds@outlook.com.

Hikers are signed up on a "first come-first served basis" and you must have a confirmed reservation to attend a hike. And please make sure you can actually make the hike; if we have late cancellations, a dog gets left behind without a hike.

For more information visit the Hiking Hounds Facebook page.


Tour the Animal Care Campus - Asheville, Oct. 27

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Did you know the Animal Care Campus in Asheville is one of the country's leading examples of a private-public partnership in animal welfare? Asheville Humane Society and Buncombe County work in close collaboration to take in, care for, re-home, and adopt out thousands of domestic animals each year. Their collective goal is to save every adoptable animal's life and make each animal's life worth living.

Now you have the opportunity to see first-hand why the Animal Care Campus is a national model. Asheville Humane Society is hosting a guided behind-the-scenes tour of the society's Adoption Center (14 Forever Friend Lane) and the Buncombe County Animal Shelter (16 Forever Friend Lane) on Saturday, October 27, from 1:30 to 3:00 PM. The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation required.

The Animal Care Campus is located on Forever Friend Lane, off Pond Road and Brevard Road, near the WNC Farmers Market. For more information, call (828) 761-2001.


$5 Adoptions Through October 31 in Asheville

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Asheville Humane's "Hocus Pocus" Adoption Event has been EXTENDED! Now through October 31, adopt any animal over 6 months old at the Asheville Humane Society Adoption Center. The Adoption Center is full of adorable adoptables -- plus there are plenty more cuties in the Buncombe County Animal Shelter just waiting to come over to the Adoption Center to get their chance to find forever homes! It's a great time to adopt. 

Although the love of a pet is priceless, all of the following are still included when you adopt! Each adoption fee includes spay/neuter, all up-to-date vaccines, behavioral training when appropriate, microchip and free 1-year registration, a free starter bag of food, and a free wellness visit with a participating veterinarian. 

To see available animals, visit www.ashevillehumane.org. The Adoption Center is located at 14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville (off Brevard and Pond Roads, near the WNC Farmers Market). It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 AM to 6 PM (Tuesdays until 7 PM). The dog and cat rooms are closed daily for naptime from 1 to 2 PM, giving animals a much-needed break. The lobby remains open where you can speak with staff, enjoy refreshments, read or watch videos!