Travel with Dogs

Dog-friendly Black Mountain, NC

Black Mountain is a charming, laid back town east of Asheville, right off Route 40. It's also remarkably dog friendly.

Blackmountaindogpark5 In Black Mountain, you'll find a small but nicely appointed off-leash dog park at the River Walk Park. It is a fenced-in, bark mulched area with shaded seating for owners and a water spigot for dogs. There is also a plastic doggie pool for splashing and cool-downs. It's known primarily to locals but anyone can use it. Just head for the Bi-Lo shopping center on NC 9, gong south out of Black Mountain. Go around the back and to the left of Bi-Lo and you'll see a parking area and the entrance to the dog park.

Blackmountain-laketomahawk1 Another great dog-friendly spot is Lake Tomahawk Park. It's located at 401 S. Laurel Circle Drive, not far from the center of town. This lovely lake has a half-mile flat path all the way around it, perfect for a low-impact walk with your pal (on-leash, please).

While in Black Mountain, be sure to visit Bone-A-Fide Bakery in the heart of town at Cherry Street Square. The bakery features homemade treats and doggie birthday cakes, as well as dog food, soaps and shampoos, collars and leashes, doggie clothing, and gifts. Bone-A-Fide is open Monday 1-6 PM, Tuesday through Saturday 11 AM - 6 PM, and Sunday 1 - 5 PM. For more information, go to  http://visitblackmountain.com/Default.aspx?ItemID=36&TabID=58&uc=info&mode=dir 


 


CANINE CRUISIN': DuPont State Forest - Part 2

Fawn lake In Part 1 of Carolina Mountain Dog's coverage of DuPont State Forest, we discussed the forest's primary attraction: its waterfalls. But there are other natural attributes of DuPont State Forest that make great destinations for you and your doggie.

Consider, for example, that there are some 90 miles of trails and dirt roads of varying difficulty, so you can hike to your heart's content. Then there are several other water features, aside from the falls, that make for enjoyable and refreshing visits.

Fawn Lake is one such destination. This lovely lake is hidden away in an access area beyond the falls, so it attracts less attention and therefore less crowds. Fawn lake has a small grassy area and sand sloping down to the water's edge, plus a short wooden dock that swimmers use for diving. The lake is very dog-friendly; in fact, no one seems to mind dogs being off-leash. Your dog will love frolicking in the shallow, warm water near shore or chasing a ball or stick further out. Be aware, however, that there is no shade, so come prepared with sunscreen, hats, etc.

Dupontwithdogs Another interesting place to take your dog is Corn Mill Shoals, which is on the way from DuPont State Forest to Fawn Lake. Corn Mill Shoals features a slippery but inviting shallow swimming area on the Little River.

Finally, try Lake Imaging if you're looking for a quiet spot for a picnic. It's a pond-sized lake with a covered picnic pavilion, located in its own access area, just before the Hooker Falls access area.

For directions to Fawn Lake, Corn Mill Shoals, and Lake Imaging, visit the CANINE CRUISIN' page.


CANINE CRUISIN': DuPont State Forest, NC - Part 1

Dupont18 DuPont State Forest, located between Hendersonville and Brevard, NC, is a hiker, biker, and dog owner's paradise. This 10,000-acre forest has numerous outstanding trails (some of the best mountain biking trails anywhere), waterfalls, lakes, and dense, cool forest. It definitely qualifies as a premier Canine Cruisin' destination -- so exceptional that it deserves more than one blog post. That's why Carolina Mountain Dog will cover it in two parts.

This first part covers DuPont's most visited attractions -- its waterfalls. There are six different falls, Triple Falls, High Falls, Hooker Falls, Bridal Veil Falls, Wintergreen Falls, and Grassy Creek Falls. Each one has its own unique qualities. For a description of each, visit http://www.dupontforest.com/attractions.asp

The falls are accessible from two parking areas, the Hooker Falls Access Area, and the Buck Forest Access Area, which has access to the high falls. If you park at the Hooker Falls area, you can walk all the way up a path and see several of the falls.

For driving directions to DuPont State Forest and additional information, visit the CANINE CRUISIN' page. In Part 2, we'll explore some of DuPont Forest's other natural attractions.


Greenville, SC: A Dog's Best Friend

Falls park greenville Greenville, SC is a dog-friendly city, worthy of a visit with your pooch.

Dogs can go off-leash at Canine Corner at Cleveland Park, a fenced, mulched dog park on Woodland Way in Greenville. For leashed walks, try Falls Park in downtown Greenville (pictured here), right along the Reedy River. It features waterfalls, gardens, and the beautiful Liberty Bridge. For ambitious excursions, there's the Greenville Hospital System Swamp Rabbit Tram Trail. It's more than 13 miles long and goes from Travelers Rest to Greenville, running along the Reedy River.

Many Greenville restaurants welcome dogs in the outdoor seating areas. If you're looking for special treats just for Fido (baked gourmet goodies as well as boutique items), head over to The Barkery Bistro, 118 North Main Street.

For lake recreation, Paris Mountain State Park is just four miles away from the city. Paris Mountain features 15-acre Lake Placid, hiking trails, and picnic and camping areas.

And if you're from the area and looking to adopt a pet, don't forget about the Greenville Humane Society.


Cruisin' the Lakes

Furman lake Over the past year, Carolina Mountain Dog has covered a number of beautiful lakes in our CANINE CRUISIN' and POOCH PATHS sections. With the warm weather upon us, lakes make a great outing for you and your dog, so we thought it might be useful to provide you with links to all of the lake stories in one place. Enjoy!

Lake Powhatan, NC
http://www.carolinamountaindog.com/2010/03/pooch-paths-lake-powhatan-asheville-nc.html

Lake Jocassee, SC
http://www.carolinamountaindog.com/2009/08/canine-cruisin-lake-jocassee-sc.html

 

Moses Cone and Julian Price Parks, Blue Ridge Parkway, NC
http://www.carolinamountaindog.com/2009/09/canine-cruisin-moses-cone-park-julian-price-park-nc.html

 

Lake Junaluska, NC

http://www.carolinamountaindog.com/2009/10/canine-cruisin-waynesville-and-lake-junaluska-nc.html

 

Furman Lake, SC

http://www.carolinamountaindog.com/2010/05/canine-cruisin-furman-lake-greenville-sc.html

 

Asheville Restaurant Features "Dog Days of Summer"

Mayfels Mayfel's, an Asheville restaurant that serves Southern Louisiana-style comfort food, is doing its part to go to the dogs. Every Thursday through the end of August, Mayfel's will donate 10 percent of its proceeds towards different Western North Carolina animal welfare organizations through its "Dog Days of Summer" promotion. Dogs are welcome to sit with their owners on the front patio or in the back courtyard.

Asheville Humane Society, Animal Compassion Network, Animal Haven of Asheville, Brother Wolf Animal Rescue, Humane Alliance Spay/Neuter Clinic, Haywood Animal Welfare Association, Madison County Animal Shelter, and Sarge's Animal Rescue Foundation are just some of the beneficiaries of the program.

Mayfel's is located at 22 College Street in downtown Asheville. Phone: (828) 252-8840.


ReTail Scene - For Dogs on the Go

Pettrek products Pet Trek is a new line of cool products that are for people and dogs on the go. Products include the Traveler, which is designed to hold food and water in two separate compartments, the Walker, with a canteen and pop-off bowl, and the Gear Pack, a backpack designed to carry doggie stuff.

These products look like they're tailor-made for hikes in the Carolina mountains. Check them out at www.pettrek.net.


Road Trips with Your Buddy

Dogonbeach The summer vacation season is upon us, and lots of folks are probably going to opt for less expensive trips that they can make by car. And that means you can take your four-legged friend along.

Or can you? Where do you stay with your dog? Where do you find beaches that allow dogs... or the best places to hike... or daycare facilities and vets in areas far from home?

As you might expect, there are websites with just that sort of information, and here are two very helpful ones that should give you everything you need to know before you take that road trip:

www.dogfriendly.com

www.petswelcome.com

Check 'em out!


Dogwood Park, Knoxville - One of "5 Best" in South

Victor ashe park Dogwood Park in Knoxville, Tennessee is considered one of the South's "5 Best Dog Parks," according to the May 2010 issue of Southern Living. The magazine says:

"Puppies are not overlooked here with a playground (constructed especially for little legs) that features a tunnel, puppuy jump, and inclined hill. Once your pooch is thoroughly worn out, he or she can drink up at a water fountain designed just for dogs. It's part of larger Victor Ashe Park, a 115-acre area that also includes a disc golf course, a children's playground, soccer fields, fishing, a 1.5-mile cross-country trail, and a paved greenway for biking or jogging."

Directions from I-40: From I-40, take the I-640 exit #385; take the Western Ave. West; head west on Western Ave; turn right onto Ballcamp Pk. at the Wendy's; turn right onto Bradshaw Rd; park will be on the left. (Note: I-40 has been reopened so travel to Knoxville from the Carolina mountains is easy again!)

For more information: http://www.ci.knoxville.tn.us/parks/victor.asp


CANINE CRUISIN': Furman Lake, Greenville, SC

Furman Lake1 If you're looking for an idyllic stroll with your dog in the Upstate, there's none better than Furman Lake, located on the campus of Furman University. The trail meanders about 1-1/4 miles around a small lake and offers shade and lovely views of the picturesque clock tower and campus. Take a picnic lunch and make it an outing.

There are other trails on campus as well, including a two-mile trail behind the lake that goes through the woods, and a portion of an eleven mile trail that stretches from downtown Greenville to Travelers Rest.

The lake and trails are open to the public, but dogs should be on leash -- and please remember to pick up after your dog. For directions and more information, visit the CANINE CRUISIN' page.

If you want to tie this stroll in with some off-leash time for your dog, check out the canine fun park in close by Greer.


Discount and Free Shipping on the Asheville Doggie Guide!

Doggieguidecover Know where the dog parks are in Asheville? Is there anyone who can scoop the poop in your yard? Do any vets offer alternative medicine? Where are the best places to hike with your dog in the Asheville/Hendersonville area? Where is there a campground that actually caters to dogs? 

You'll get the answers to these questions in the new 2010 Edition of the Asheville Doggie Guide -- everything for dogs in the Asheville, Hendersonville, and Black Mountain, NC area!

This handy pocket-size guide includes adoption organizations, animal services, dog bakeries and boutiques, boarding facilities, dog-friendly campgrounds, doggie daycare, dog parks, grooming services, dog photographers, poop pick-up services, dog therapy, hiking trails, dog training, sitters, vets, and more, plus adoption information, safety tips, and pet rules and regulations for Buncombe and Henderson Counties. It has hundreds of listings -- names, addresses, phone numbers, emails, and websites -- saving hours and hours of research time! You will refer to it often. There is no other resource available like the Asheville Doggie Guide.

Pick up your copy today at Three Dog Bakery, 21 Battery Park in Asheville (a block away from the Grove Arcade). Or order the guide online via this special offer:

The publisher's list price for the Asheville Doggie Guide is $19.95, but you can get your copy of the guide for $13.95, a savings of $6! You'll get a $6 rebate when you purchase the Asheville Doggie Guide directly from the publisher! Learn about this special offer here. 
Added bonus: Enter the code FREEMAIL305 when you order online and get free shipping through May 1!


POOCH PATHS: Biltmore Estate, Asheville, NC

Biltmore_Overview The Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina is one of the country's national treasures. It's also a naturally beautiful and protected walking, hiking, and biking paradise for dogs and their owners. George Vanderbilt, who built the magnificent structure, was a dog lover, and the estate carries on his tradition by welcoming leashed dogs onto the property (but not in the house). There are numerous trails of varying difficulty that lend themselves to hours and hours of walking, hiking, and biking.

The downside is that one must pay the full $65 daily admission price to use the facilities. However, a smart alternative for anyone who is within reasonable driving distance is to purchase a Twelve-Month Pass. The passholder is able to gain unlimited entry to the estate at any time of year for $105 annually. If you purchase the pass by May 16, you can get it for $85, a savings of $20. Passholders are also entitled to other benefits, such as priority dining reservations and discounts at estate stores. A few visits with your dog will make the pass worth the price, so it's something you should consider.

For basic walking or biking with your dog, the best place on the Biltmore Estate is probably the area surrounding and adjacent to Antler Hill Village and the winery. Park near the winery and pick up the paved trail that leads to the duck pond. It is a beautiful flat trail that meanders along the French Broad River and winds up at a duck pond where your doggie will love watching the ever-present geese. An added bonus is that you can return to the just-opened Antler Hill Village, where you'll find Cedric's Tavern, named after one of George Vanderbilt's beloved dogs, and a Creamery, which serves outstanding ice cream. Both eateries have outdoor seating and dogs are permitted to sit beside you while you enjoy lunch, dinner, or a treat.CedricsTavern

Another great area for a walk is behind the house itself. Drive past the house and park in the lot for "A Gardener's Place," the plant and gift shop located near the greenhouse. Then cross the road to the Azalea Gardens. You'll find a wonderful paved path that winds through these gardens (the azaleas are spectacular in season) and eventually leads to a pond and waterfall. It's a memorable walk.

There are many more trails on the property, including some for serious hiking. Just ask for a trail map and follow whichever ones appeal to you. You could easily spend a day adventuring with your dog. Right now is a great time to visit because it's Biltmore's annual Festival of Flowers.

For directions and more information about Biltmore, visit the POOCH PATHS page.


Dogs and Car Safety

Oven_new1 Two big safety concerns related to cars always pop up as the weather gets warmer: leaving a dog in a hot car, and letting a dog ride in the open bed of a pickup truck.

Hot Cars
On warm days, the inside of a car heats up very quickly. For example, when it's 85 degrees outside, the inside temperature of a car with the windows slightly open can reach 102 degrees in 10 minutes. According to the Animal Protection Institute, a dog's normal body temperature ranges from 101 to 102.5 degrees. Dogs can withstand a body temperature of 107 to 108 degrees for only a very short period of time before suffering serious effects or even death... so don't take a risk leaving your dog in a car when temperatures are on the rise. For more information, visit www.mydogiscool.com .

Pickup Trucks
Dogs riding in the open beds of pickup trucks may look like they're having fun -- but they're not safe. A dog can easily be thrown from the truck bed onto the road. According to The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), there is no brand of harness known that has been proven safe to restrain a dog in the open bed of a pickup truck. Instead, says HSUS, put your dog in the cab in a travel crate or other pet carrier.


CANINE CRUISIN': Fun Park for Dogs in the Upstate

Dogparksign If you live in or are traveling to the Upstate, you'll find a place near Greer where your dog can play all day. "Six Wags of Greer" is a privately-run dog park that features 3 very large fenced in play areas for small, medium, and large dogs -- complete with benches, toys, shade, and a running creek. It also includes two separate play areas for dogs that might do better playing alone, and one of those areas is outfitted with agility equipment.

You pay $5 for an "all-day pass" for your first dog, and $2 for each additional dog. It's a bargain even for a few hours of fun. The park is well-maintained and open 7 days a week from 7 AM to 8 PM. If no one's at the small shack on the property, just leave your money in the mail slot.

Chesteratsixwags Six Wags of Greer is located on Highway 14, between Landrum and Greer, about 6 miles beyond the intersection of Highway 11 and Highway 14, heading towards Greer. The park will be on your right. Visit the CANINE CRUISIN' page for more photos of the park. (If you're using a GPS, put in the address 3671 Highway 14, Greer.)


Everything for Dogs in Asheville and Hendersonville

Doggieguidecover Know where the dog parks are in Asheville? Is there anyone who can scoop the poop in your yard? Do any vets offer alternative medicine? Where are the best places to hike with your dog in the Asheville/Hendersonville area? Where is there a campground that actually caters to dogs? 

You'll get the answers to these questions in the new 2010 Edition of the Asheville Doggie Guide -- everything for dogs in the Asheville, Hendersonville, and Black Mountain, NC area!

This handy pocket-size guide includes adoption organizations, animal services, dog bakeries and boutiques, boarding facilities, dog-friendly campgrounds, doggie daycare, dog parks, grooming services, dog photographers, poop pick-up services, dog therapy, hiking trails, dog training, sitters, vets, and more, plus adoption information, safety tips, and pet rules and regulations for Buncombe and Henderson Counties. It has hundreds of listings -- names, addresses, phone numbers, emails, and websites -- saving hours and hours of research time! You will refer to it often. There is no other resource available like the Asheville Doggie Guide.

Pick up your copy today at Three Dog Bakery, 21 Battery Park in Asheville (a block away from the Grove Arcade). Or order the guide online via this special offer:

The publisher's list price for the Asheville Doggie Guide is $19.95, but you can get your copy of the guide for $13.95, a savings of $6! You'll get a $6 rebate when you purchase the Asheville Doggie Guide directly from the publisher! Learn about this special offer here.


Driving Dogs

You've got to see the new Subaru commercials that just started appearing on TV: They feature dogs driving a Subaru Forester! You can watch the ads on National Geographic Channel's "Dog Whisperer Marathon" on February 15, and during the Westiminster Dog Show (Feb. 15 and 16 on the USA cable network.) One of the best of the bunch is included below.

Subaru reports that half of Subaru drivers own a pet, so why not appeal directly to the dog-owning audience? Subaru also has a relationship with the ASPCA, one of several charities the carmaker supported during its "Share the Love" sales event.

Subaru isn't the only auto company that recognizes the power of the pack. Honda offers the Element with a special "dog-friendly package" that includes a rear car kennel, pet bed, stowable ramp, and more. There's even a website that rates dog-friendly cars: www.dogcars.com.


 


CANINE CRUISIN': Max Patch, NC

Max-patch-102109 041 If you're looking for a little piece of heaven for both you and your doggie, cruise on up to Max Patch. True, it's in the middle of nowhere, close to the Tennessee border, more than an hour northwest of Asheville, NC. And as you drive up about seven miles of gravel-packed, winding road to reach Max Patch, you'll be thinking "This better be good."

It's worth it. Max Patch is a bald about 4200 feet high, and the road gets you pretty close to the top. A short hike and you reach a flat, open area that is breathtaking, to say the least. You'll love the 360-degree panoramic views. You'll feel as if you're on top of the world. Your dog will love cavorting on the large grassy hillsides. No one seems to mind well-behaved off-leash dogs up there. It'll be easy to spot your buddy from most any vantage point.

File this one away for a lovely spring day or, better yet, make it an outing on a hot summer day. The cool breezes and spectacular locale are guaranteed to help you chill out.

You can reach Max Patch off Route 40 West (Exit 7), but a recent rock slide may get in your way. The alternate route, not nearly as direct, is to wind your way through Hot Springs. (See the CANINE CRUISIN' page for detailed directions and additional information.)


CANINE CRUISIN': Montreat, NC

Montreat memorial garden Montreat is a tiny, secluded town north of Black Mountain that is home to Montreat College and the Montreat Conference Center, which is surrounded by 2,500 acres of unspoiled wilderness. Montreat is a dog lover's paradise because it is an ideal destination for either a casual walk or a serious hike. There are numerous trails, many of which run alongside rushing creeks, set amidst dense trees in the mountains. If you're looking for a spot that gets you close to nature and elevates your spirits, Montreat is it.

While Montreat is typically a spring and summer destination, it is less crowded in the fall and winter. It is cool year-round, so dress appropriately.

For an easy, flat trail that runs alongside a creek, go through the Montreat stone gate and enter the gravel parking lot immediately on your right. There you'll find a memorial garden and a good walking trail that's shaded and cool and has plenty of opportunities for your dog to go into the rushing water of the creek.

Montreat092709 028 For more vigorous hiking, go all the way up Assembly Drive until it becomes Grayhead Trail. Continue to the end until you reach the Trailhead. There are a number of trails there that lead through the forests, some more challenging than others.

You can find a link to a trail map and detailed trail descriptions on the Montreat Conference Center's website at: http://www.montreat.org/programs/wilderness. For more information about Montreat, visit the CANINE CRUISIN' page.


Local Getaways with Your Dog

If you're looking for a way to kick back and relax, how about a local getaway with your dog? Fall and Winter are good times to enjoy the beauty and serenity of the Carolina mountains. The days are cooler, the evenings are crisp, and the area is less crowded. While there are numerous pet-friendly hotels and inns in WNC and the Upstate, it's hard to beat these two because they truly cater to dogs -- and pamper you as well.

Pondercove Bed and Breakfast at Ponder Cove
Here you and your dog can romp on 91 acres and still be just 30 minutes north of Asheville. This sumptuous bed and breakfast inn features spectacular gardens and luxury accommodations. A two-bedroom 1938 fully restored bungalow is also available on the property. Amenities include a welcome doggy basket, complimentary treats, an off-leash play area, concierge service, and a gourmet breakfast.
1067 Ponder Creek Road, Mars Hill, NC 28754
866-689-7304, 828-689-7304
www.pondercove.com

Barkwells Barkwells
This fully fenced mountain retreat has more than 8 acres of fenced meadows and a pond and is 20 minutes from Asheville and close to Hendersonville. Barkwells has a variety of dog-friendly luxury rental cabins with dog doors, gated porches, and fenced yards. Each cabin has a fully equipped kitchen and complete amenities, including such extras as charcoal grills and hot tubs. And your dog has the run of the place.
290 Lane Road, Mills River, NC 28759
828-891-8288
www.barkwells.com


What to Do if You Lose Your Dog

Sad-dog The number of stray dogs that come through local animal shelters in the Carolina mountains is amazing. Where do these dogs come from? Are they all lost?

Don't let your dog be one of them. You can avoid losing your dog in the first place by using proper identification. It is best to have your dog microchipped. A tiny chip is painlessly inserted behind the dog's neck. This can be done at a shelter, at a microchip clinic, or at your vet's office. You then file contact information with the microchip provider. If your dog is found and turned in, authorities will scan the dog for a unique ID number and call the provider to match the dog up with your information. In addition to a microchip, your dog should always be wearing some form of ID. This will make it easy for anyone who finds your dog to contact you. You can choose anything from inexpensive tags to designer tags to tags connected to pet-finding services. (Carolina Mountain Dog offers original high quality ID tags from Dog Tag Art via the button on the right under "Good Buys.")

If you do lose your dog, take action right away. Often, a dog is closer to home or the point of loss than you may think, so make the rounds, call your dog, and shake a bag of treats. This might do the trick. Put the word out about your lost dog and offer a reward. Obviously, you should inform family, friends, and neighbors first.

File a lost dog report with your local shelter immediately, and keep checking back with the shelter periodically to see if your dog shows up. Make up and post signs where the dog was lost. Use email, Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media you're familiar with to publicize your dog. Check "Found" ads and place a "Lost" ad on your local Craigslist (www.craigslist.org) and on local newspaper websites.

There are other websites that could help you out as well. In Western North Carolina, there's www.LostPetsWNC.org, a free service where you can post a listing and search to see if your pet has been reported.

National sites with lost and found sections include:
www.petfinder.com
www.pets911.com
www.thefoundbin.com
www.petharbor.com
www.lostmydoggie.com
www.lostpetsos.org
www.flealess.org/lostpets
www.petchaser.com
www.fidofinder.com
www.amberpetalert.com
www.lostandfoundpetsca.com (California)
www.lostandfoundpetsnewyork.com (New York)
www.lostandfoundpetstexas.com (Texas)


(Note: There may be fees associated with some of these sites.)

For additional helpful tips, go to: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-care-tips/finding-a-lost-pet.html